Event Abstract

Differential replicabilty of the magnetic mismatch negativity to length and frequency deviants over the early and later response phases

  • 1 MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, United Kingdom
  • 2 GSK Clinical Unit, United Kingdom
  • 3 Brain Mapping Unit & Behavioural and Clinical Neurosciences Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Magnetic mismatch negativity (MMNm) has been long suggested to have a clinical potential. This, in turn, requires its validation as a stable and reliable neurophysiological measure. To address this, volunteers were tested in two identical MMNm experiments separated by approximately one month. The stimuli in a multi-feature MMN paradigm consisted of a standard 330 ms tone (275 Hz + two harmonics), a 20% longer length deviant, 20% higher-pitch frequency deviant, and 4 further deviants which are not analyzed here. MEG data were recorded using 306-channel Elekta-Neuromag system. We employed Signal Space Separation [1], in conjunction with continuous head position monitoring (cHPI) to minimize the effects of adjusting for movement within and between visits. Building on earlier findings [2] we observe good reliability of the first peak of the MMNm at ~120ms for both frequency and length deviants, though there is a small but non-significant reduction in amplitude in the second visit. Later, in 400-600 ms time range, the responses exhibited different dynamics, with significantly smaller amplitudes in the second than the first visit for the frequency deviants. Although a trend for this was also observed for the length deviants, it did not become significant. This can be potentially related to tuning of neuronal representations for the experimental stimuli and/or differential attention to the stimuli in the two sessions which affected their secondary processing but not the initial deviance detection. We conclude that the first phase of the MMN response may constitute a more reliable index of the brain’s auditory discrimination capacity and that length processing is less susceptible to long-term repetition effects than frequency perception.

References

1. Taulu, S., Simola, J. & Kajola, M. (2005) ‘Applications of the Signal Space Separation Method’, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, vol. 53, no. 9, pp. 3359-3372.

2. Tervaniemi, M., Sinkkonen, J., Virtanen, J., Kallio, J., Ilmoniemi, J., Salonen, O. & Näätänen, R. (2005) ‘Test-retest stability of the magnetic mismatch response (MMNm)’ Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 116, no. 8, pp. 1897-1905.

Conference: MMN 09 Fifth Conference on Mismatch Negativity (MMN) and its Clinical and Scientific Applications, Budapest, Hungary, 4 Apr - 7 Apr, 2009.

Presentation Type: Poster Presentation

Topic: Poster Presentations

Citation: Smith M, Shtyrov Y, Henson R, Christensen S, Nathan P, Bullmore E and Pulvermüller F (2009). Differential replicabilty of the magnetic mismatch negativity to length and frequency deviants over the early and later response phases. Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: MMN 09 Fifth Conference on Mismatch Negativity (MMN) and its Clinical and Scientific Applications. doi: 10.3389/conf.neuro.09.2009.05.156

Received: 26 Mar 2009; Published Online: 26 Mar 2009.

* Correspondence: Marie Smith, MRC Cognition & Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom, marie.smith@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk

© 2007 - 2017 Frontiers Media S.A. All Rights Reserved