Event Abstract

Detecting target/nontarget differences in ERP components from a visual oddball task with separate PCAs: Young vs. older adults

  • 1 Western Sydney University, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Australia
  • 2 University of Wollongong, Brain & Behaviour Research Institute and School of Psychology, Australia

Aims: Barry et al. (2016) demonstrated that condition-related differences between Go and NoGo event-related potential (ERP) components are best identified using separate principal components analyses (PCAs). This optimised PCA methodology was established using ERPs from an auditory equiprobable task completed by young adults. The present study aimed to test the sensitivity of this approach in differentiating target/nontarget condition effects between young and older adults in a visual oddball task. Methods: Equal numbers of young (N = 19, Mage = 21.2, SD = 3.7 years) and older adults (N = 19, Mage = 68.1, SD = 4.6 years) completed a visual oddball task and had their electroencephalographic (EEG) activity recorded. ERP component amplitudes were quantified with separate unrestricted PCAs for each age group and stimulus condition using Varimax rotation. Results: Error rates (omission/commission) and reaction times did not differ between groups. The four separate PCAs detected a range of ERP components. For rare targets, both groups showed a centro-parietal N1 (young = 108 ms, older = 100 ms), central P2 (young = 148 ms, older = 140 ms), centro-parietal P3 (young and older = 372 ms), and a frontally-negative/parietally-positive Slow Wave (SW; young and older = 452 ms). Target N2 was more clearly identifiable in young (N2 = 204 ms) compared to older adults. For frequent nontargets, both groups had identifiable N1s (young = 76 ms, older = 68 ms), temporo-occipital Processing Negativity (PN; young = 116 ms, older = 148 ms), and diffuse nontarget P3 (young = 308 ms, older = 356 ms). Conclusions: Despite statistically indistinguishable task performance and broadly similar component latencies, older adults had more topographically-diffuse components cf. young adults. Results from separate PCAs suggest that task performance can be maintained in healthy ageing via the recruitment of a wider range of associative neuronal networks.

Acknowledgements

We thank The Illawarra Retirement Trust (IRT) and the management of IRT Links Seaside for their kind assistance in providing facilities and encouraging resident participation in this project. We also thank Frances De Blasio for collecting the data.

References

Barry, R.J., De Blasio, F.M., Fogarty, J.S., Karamacoska, D., 2016. ERP Go/NoGo condition effects are better detected with separate PCAs. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 106, 50-64.

Keywords: event-related potentials (ERP), target, Nontarget, oddball task, older adults, Healthy Ageing, Ageing, Principal Components Analysis (PCA)

Conference: ASP2016 - The 26th Annual Meeting of the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology, Adelaide Australia, Adelaide,SA, Australia, 12 Dec - 14 Dec, 2016.

Presentation Type: Oral Presentation

Topic: Abstract (general)

Citation: Steiner GZ, Barry RJ and Fogarty JS (2016). Detecting target/nontarget differences in ERP components from a visual oddball task with separate PCAs: Young vs. older adults. Conference Abstract: ASP2016 - The 26th Annual Meeting of the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology, Adelaide Australia. doi: 10.3389/conf.fnhum.2016.221.00006

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Received: 20 Nov 2016; Published Online: 05 Dec 2016.

* Correspondence: Dr. Genevieve Z Steiner, Western Sydney University, The National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM), Penrith, New South Wales, 2751, Australia, G.Steiner@westernsydney.edu.au

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