Event Abstract

One-month treatment with olive oil decreased the weight of spleen and increased the weight of prostate in Wistar rats

  • 1 Medical School of the University of Montenegro, Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical pharmacology, Montenegro
  • 2 Medical School of the University in Novi Sad, Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical pharmacology, Serbia

Introduction. It is believed that olive oil (OO) contains a variety of pharmacologically active substances due to which it possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, vasoprotective and neuroprotectivne effects, and for those reason it is recommended in the prevention and treatment of many diseases. The aim of our study was to examine whether and to what extent one-month treatment with OO influences total weight gain (TWG) and relative weight (RW) of some organs in experimental animals. Methods.The study was conducted on two groups of six sexually mature Wistar rats, weight approximately 300g. Animals of the control group (C, n = 6) received only food and water ad libitum during thirty days. Experimental group of animals (OO, n = 6) received OO (1ml/kgBW daily). Body weight (BW) was measured at the beginning of the study and in intervals of seven days. At the end of treatment, animals were sacrificed and liver, spleen, left kidney, prostate and left testicle were separated and measured. RW of organs was calculated as the ratio of organ weight and total BW. Results were statistically processed using the Student’s T-test. Results. The TWG in seven-day intervals and at the end of treatment was statistically unchanged in OO compared with C group (p> 0.05). Compared to the first measurement, the average BW of control group (C) was increased for about 35%, and of experimental group (OO) for about 46%. We found that RW of liver, kidney and testis did not differ in OO compared with C group (p>0.05). However, one-month treatment with OO significantly decreased the RW of spleen (4.33+0.79/2.73+0.69, p<0.01) and significantly increased the RW of prostate (1.37+0.12/1.78+0.27, p<0.05). Conclusion. Our results speak in favor of some published results and confirm the likely immunosuppressive effect of olive oil, which resulted in a reduction of the relative weight of spleen. There is the need for additional investigations in order to explain the effect of olive oil on rats’ prostate with more details.

Keywords: olive oil, Spleen, Prostate, immunosuppresion

Conference: 8th Southeast European Congress on Xenobiotic Metabolism and Toxicity - XEMET 2010, Thessaloniki, Greece, 1 Oct - 5 Oct, 2010.

Presentation Type: Poster

Topic: Food, drugs and environmental xenobiotics

Citation: Duborija-Kovacevic N, Jakovljevic V, Sabo A and Tomic Z (2010). One-month treatment with olive oil decreased the weight of spleen and increased the weight of prostate in Wistar rats. Front. Pharmacol. Conference Abstract: 8th Southeast European Congress on Xenobiotic Metabolism and Toxicity - XEMET 2010. doi: 10.3389/conf.fphar.2010.60.00115

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Received: 05 Mar 2011; Published Online: 04 Nov 2010.

* Correspondence: Dr. Natasha Duborija-Kovacevic, Medical School of the University of Montenegro, Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Clinical pharmacology, Podgorica, Montenegro, DUBORIJAN@ac.me