Event Abstract

Symposium Session 1. Neural mechanisms of feature integration in object perception

  • 1 University of California at San Diego, United States
  • 2 Otto-von-Guericke University, Germany

Objects in the natural world typically have multiple features but are perceived as unitary wholes. Understanding how the separate features of an object are combined into a unitary perceptual experience has come to be known as the “binding problem”. Recent ERP and MEG studies have provided insight into the role of selective attention in binding the distinctive features of an object into a unified percept. These recordings show that when attention is directed to one feature of an object there is a rapid activation of its other features in their specialized cortical areas, even when those features are not relevant to the immediate task. In this symposium we will present evidence that co-activation of relevant (attended) and irrelevant features occurs within the visual modality for a wide variety of features (Schoenfeld & Hillyard) as well as between the auditory and visual modalities (Woldorff). The role of gamma oscillations in this attention-driven feature binding will be critically evaluated (Herrmann).

Keywords: binding problem, Feature integration, object perception

Conference: XI International Conference on Cognitive Neuroscience (ICON XI), Palma, Mallorca, Spain, 25 Sep - 29 Sep, 2011.

Presentation Type: Introduction

Topic: Symposium 1: Neural mechanisms of feature integration in object perception

Citation: Hillyard S and Schoenfeld A (2011). Symposium Session 1. Neural mechanisms of feature integration in object perception. Front. Hum. Neurosci. Conference Abstract: XI International Conference on Cognitive Neuroscience (ICON XI). doi: 10.3389/conf.fnhum.2011.207.00010

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Received: 02 Nov 2011; Published Online: 08 Nov 2011.

* Correspondence: Dr. Steven Hillyard, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, United States, shillyard@ucsd.edu

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