Event Abstract

Contributions from white and grey matter on structural connectomes of temporal lobe epilepsy patients

  • 1 Newcastle University, Institute of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medical Sciences, United Kingdom

Purpose: Reduced volumes in brain areas of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients is commonly observed. Alterations in white matter connectivity have also been shown. However, it is not fully understood how these are related. Method: In this study we compare regional and network features of patient and control connectome maps. We compare data from 22 patients with left TLE and 39 control subjects. Results: We find that patients have significant alterations in region size but only subtle changes in white matter connectivity. When region size and white matter connectivity are combined this leads to significant alterations in connectivity strength. Conclusion: Connectomics is frequently used to compare brain networks, however our results suggest caution should be used when interpreting the results where there are known alterations in regional properties. Our work unifies results from regional and connectomic literature.

References

Taylor, Peter N., et al. "Structural connectivity changes in temporal lobe epilepsy: Spatial features contribute more than topological measures." NeuroImage: Clinical 8 (2015): 322-328.

Keywords: Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, connectome, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, networks

Conference: Neuroinformatics 2016, Reading, United Kingdom, 3 Sep - 4 Sep, 2016.

Presentation Type: Investigator presentations

Topic: Clinical neuroscience

Citation: Taylor PN (2016). Contributions from white and grey matter on structural connectomes of temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Front. Neuroinform. Conference Abstract: Neuroinformatics 2016. doi: 10.3389/conf.fninf.2016.20.00018

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Received: 26 Apr 2016; Published Online: 18 Jul 2016.

* Correspondence: Dr. Peter N Taylor, Newcastle University, Institute of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, NE2 4HH, United Kingdom, peter.taylor@newcastle.ac.uk

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