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Perspective ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Immunol. | doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2019.01834

Bordeaux 2018 : Wine, cheese and γδ T cells

  • 1Department of Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Center for Immunity and Inflammation, New Jersey Medical School, United States
  • 2Great Ormond Street Hospital, United Kingdom
  • 3Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, Faculty of Population Health Sciences, University College London, United Kingdom
  • 4Blizard Institute, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, United Kingdom
  • 5Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Centre, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • 6Institute of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Portugal

The first ‘International γδ T cell conference’ took place in Denver, CO (USA) in 2004. Since then, a new meeting is held every two years. During each conference, all participants voted to choose between candidate bids for where to hold the next conference. At the conference held in London in 2016, a majority opted for the bid from a team proposing the 2018 event be held in Bordeaux, France – which is where we therefore gathered on 7-10th of June 2018. The meeting was an undisputed success and it gave us the opportunity to take stock of the increasing basic knowledge about γδ T cells as well as the rapidly expanding interest and activities developing using γδ T cells towards clinical applications. If we were to point to one single ‘take home lesson’; we could say that this conference underlined the impression that the γδ T cell compartment comprises functionally diverse subsets that can occupy niches contributing to either innate or adaptive immunity, and potentially the interface between the two.

Keywords: Gamma Delta T cells, Conference report, Recent advances, Ongoing research, Futures perspectives

Received: 27 May 2019; Accepted: 22 Jul 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 Edelblum, Gustafsson, Pennington, Willcox and Ribot. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Karen Edelblum, Center for Immunity and Inflammation, New Jersey Medical School, Department of Pathology, Immunology & Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, 07103, New Jersey, United States, karen.edelblum@rutgers.edu
Dr. Julie C. Ribot, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal, julie.ribot@gmail.com