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Front. Neurol. | doi: 10.3389/fneur.2018.00102

Follow-up analysis of serum TRAIL protein and gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from ischemic stroke patients

 Kemal Ugur Tufekci1, 2, Ufuk Vurgun1, 2,  Onur Yigitaslan3,  Pembe Keskinoglu4, Erdem Yaka3, Kursad Kutluk3 and  Sermin Genc1, 2*
  • 1Izmir International Biomedicine and Genome Institute, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey
  • 2Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Health Sciences, Dokuz Eylul University, Turkey
  • 3Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey
  • 4Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eylül University, Turkey

Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is TNF receptor superfamily member, contributes to several diseases pathogenesis. The aim of this research was to investigate the relevance of serum TRAIL protein levels and mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with stroke through six months follow-up. We enrolled patients with first-ever acute ischemic stroke (n=95) and healthy controls (n=95) in this study. Follow-up blood samples were collected from patients at day 7, 28, and 180 after the onset. The stroke severity was evaluated by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. TRAIL protein levels were quantified by using ELISA kits and TRAIL mRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR. Our study showed that stroke patients have statistically significant lower levels of serum TRAIL protein (p<0.0001) and elevated TRAIL mRNA expression (p<0.0001) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at the disease onset. Our follow-up study revealed that TRAIL protein levels were downregulated while mRNA expression levels were increased in later periods. Overall, our findings suggest that serum TRAIL levels and mRNA expression in PBMC could reliably serve as a predictor of stroke outcome. Additionally, our study supports that TRAIL plays a role in pathogenesis and progression of ischemic stroke.

Keywords: Stroke, TRAIL, biomarker, Ischemia, follow-up

Received: 22 Nov 2017; Accepted: 13 Feb 2018.

Edited by:

Midori A. Yenari, University of California, San Francisco, United States

Reviewed by:

Edward C. Jauch, Medical University of South Carolina, United States
Shunya Takizawa, Tokai University, Japan  

Copyright: © 2018 Tufekci, Vurgun, Yigitaslan, Keskinoglu, Yaka, Kutluk and Genc. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: MD, PhD. Sermin Genc, Izmir International Biomedicine and Genome Institute, Dokuz Eylül University, Izmir, Turkey, sermin.genc@deu.edu.tr