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Front. Plant Sci. | doi: 10.3389/fpls.2019.01192

ER-phagy and ER Stress Response (ERSR) in Plants

  • 1School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
  • 2Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the starting point for protein secretion and lipid biosynthesis in eukaryotes. ER homeostasis is precisely regulated by the unfolded protein response (UPR) to alleviate stress, involving both transcriptional and translational regulators. Autophagy is an intracellular self-eating process mediated by the double-membrane structure autophagosome for the degradation of cytosolic components and damaged organelles to regenerate nutrient supplies under nutrient deficient or stress conditions. A recent study has revealed that besides serving as membrane source for phagophore formation, the ER is also tightly regulated under stress conditions by a distinct type of autophagosome, namely ER-phagy. ER-phagy has been characterized with receptors clearly identified in mammal and yeast, yet relatively little is known about plant ER-phagy and its receptors. Here, we will summarise our current knowledge of ER-phagy in yeast and mammals, and highlight recent progress in plant ER-phagy studies, pointing towards a possible interplay between ER-phagy and ER-homeostasis under ER stress responses (ERSR) in plants.

Keywords: Autophagy, ER-phagy, ER stress responses, Unfolded Protein Response, IRE1

Received: 20 Mar 2019; Accepted: 29 Aug 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 ZENG, LI, ZHANG and Jiang. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
Dr. Yonglun ZENG, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, China, zengyonglun.allen@gmail.com
Miss. BAIYING LI, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, China, zorralee@gmail.com
Prof. Liwen Jiang, School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, China, ljiang@cuhk.edu.hk