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Front. Psychol. | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01140

Why awe promotes prosocial behaviors? The mediating effects of future time perspective and self-transcendence meaning of life

 Jing J. Li1,  Kai Dou1*, Yu J. Wang2 and Yan G. Nie1*
  • 1Research Center of Adolescent Psychology and Behavior, School of Education, Guangzhou University, China
  • 2School of Marxism, Guangdong Industry Technical College, China

Awe is an emotion experience when individuals encounter with such powerful stimulate beyond their own understanding. Guided by conceptual analysis of awe as a trait positive emotion, we tested the hypothesis that dispositional awe results in an improvement of individual’s self-transcendence meaning of life and affects future time perspective, and increase prosocial behavior. Mediational data demonstrate that the effects of awe on prosociality are explained, by improving self-transcendence meaning of life self and future time perspective. These findings indicate that awe may help situate individuals within broader social contexts and enhance collective concern.

Keywords: awe, Prosocial Behavior, future time perspective, self-transcendence meaning of life, China, adolescence

Received: 11 Oct 2018; Accepted: 30 Apr 2019.

Edited by:

Gary D. Sherman, Stony Brook University, United States

Reviewed by:

Paul Conway, Florida State University, United States
Pilar Carrera, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain  

Copyright: © 2019 Li, Dou, Wang and Nie. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence:
PhD. Kai Dou, Guangzhou University, Research Center of Adolescent Psychology and Behavior, School of Education, Guangzhou, China, psydk@gzhu.edu.cn
Prof. Yan G. Nie, Guangzhou University, Research Center of Adolescent Psychology and Behavior, School of Education, Guangzhou, China, nie-yangang@gzhu.edu.cn