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Original Research ARTICLE Provisionally accepted The full-text will be published soon. Notify me

Front. Psychol. | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02595

The Mediating Role of Psychological Need Thwarting in the Relationship between Compulsory Citizenship Behavior and Psychological Withdrawal

  • 1Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • 2Government College for Women University, Pakistan
  • 3Ohio University, United States
  • 4Zhongnan University of Economics and Law, China

This study aims to test a novel process underlying the relationship between compulsory citizenship behavior and psychological withdrawal. Specifically, based on basic psychological needs theory, thwarting of autonomy and relatedness needs were expected to explain the association between compulsory citizenship behavior and psychological withdrawal. The PROCESS macro was used to analyze the data collected from 368 clerical staff working in public universities in Pakistan. The results confirmed that thwarting of autonomy and relatedness need mediated the relationship between compulsory citizenship behavior and psychological withdrawal. This study makes a significant contribution to the unexplored domain of the process employees use to cope with compulsory citizenship behavior. It also highlights the role of an understudied construct, i.e., psychological need thwarting as a crucial motivational mechanism for elucidating the relationship between compulsory citizenship behavior and psychological withdrawal. The findings of this study provide recommendations for future researchers, along with its implications for practitioners.

Keywords: Compulsory citizenship behavior, autonomy need thwarting, relatedness need thwarting, psychological withdrawal, Basic psychological needs theory

Received: 19 Sep 2019; Accepted: 31 Oct 2019.

Copyright: © 2019 Bashir, Shaheen, Saleem, Bhutta, Abrar and ZHAO. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

* Correspondence: Dr. Sharjeel Saleem, Government College University, Faisalabad, Faisalabad, 38000, Punjab, Pakistan, sharjilsaleem@gmail.com