Research Topic

Neuroimaging in individuals at high-risk for psychosis and first-episode psychosis

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About this Research Topic

Hosted By:
Jun Soo Kwon, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
Co-host:
Stephan Ruhrmann, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, German ...

Hosted By:
Jun Soo Kwon, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
Co-host:
Stephan Ruhrmann, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, German
Eva Maria Meisenzahl, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany

Recent researches on psychosis have focused on the early stage of psychosis due to the potential for early intervention that could delay or prevent the onset of psychosis. The early detection and accurate identification of individuals at the earliest stage of psychosis is the key element of early intervention. To elucidate vulnerability to psychosis current literature employs two research approaches. The genetic high-risk approach focuses on non-psychotic first-degree relatives of patients with psychosis. The clinical high-risk approach focuses on individuals who are considered to be at an increased risk for psychotic disorders based on state plus trait risk factor criteria.
The recent application of brain imaging in these high-risk populations has contributed to the unprecedented growth in our knowledge about the neural basis of psychosis, particularly providing insights into brain changes during the period of transition from the at-risk state to the psychosis state. Recent studies suggest that alterations in brain structure, function, and chemistry observed in psychosis are present before the onset of psychosis and there are different developmental trajectories in high-risk populations. In addition, recent works have demonstrated the feasibility to identify individuals at high-risk for psychosis and predict disease transition using brain imaging data. Brain imaging as biological markers for psychosis can improve the specificity and validity of an early diagnosis and detection. Therefore, the research for biological markers of vulnerability to psychosis is rapidly growing.
This Research Topic presents recent advances in neuroimaging in individuals at high-risk for psychosis. We encourage contributions that address brain abnormalities in populations at genetic high-risk and/or clinical high-risk. Biological vulnerability markers for psychosis can be studied using diverse brain imaging tools (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-MRI, functional MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), magnetoencephalography (MEG), event-related potential (ERP), positron emission tomography (PET), etc.), with the full range of analysis methods available. Contributions to Research Topic can be either original research papers or review articles, the overview of relevant literatures describing brain abnormalities in high-risk groups. It is intended that this volume will provide important insights into how brain changes through the course of psychosis as mechanisms of disease development, and the feasibility of biomarkers for early detection.


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