Research Topic

Determination of the Chemical Composition of the Stars of Different Types in Our Galaxy

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Our galaxy consists of different substructures: thin and thick discs, bulge, halo etc. These substructures contain stars of different types, in particular, with different metallicity level.

A study of the chemical composition of these stars provides a crucial information about the chemical evolution of our stellar system as a whole. Up to now we have not a final solution to the problem of the formation of the Milky Way - was it a hierarchical process from the large structure to the smaller substructures, or was our galaxy formed as a result of merging processes involving smaller stellar systems like dwarf galaxies and globular clusters?

The study of the chemical properties of the stars from different substructures of the Milky Way can shed light on this astrophysical enigma. Additionally, the study of chemical abundances of these stars (metal-poor stars and extremely metal-poor stars) gives us the key to understand which supernovae stars enriched the interstellar medium in the early stages of the Galaxy evolution, which physical characteristics are inherent in them, what are the masses of those stars and how they exploded. Today, great efforts are being made to conduct the large-scale study of the chemical properties of various galactic objects in order to recreate the holistic picture of the galaxy evolution.

This Research Topic aims to enrich our knowledge about the synthesis of various chemical elements in the galaxy and their distribution in various subsystems. We welcome authors to submit papers on the theory of chemical evolution of the galaxy.

In particular, we are looking for submissions that address how massive stars and intermediate-mass stars are responsible for the processes of nucleosynthesis. We also welcome contributions that explore the chemical properties of the stars that we see today and how the nuclei of various chemical elements were formed, in what processes and in what quantities.


Keywords: abundances, galaxy, chemical evolution


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Our galaxy consists of different substructures: thin and thick discs, bulge, halo etc. These substructures contain stars of different types, in particular, with different metallicity level.

A study of the chemical composition of these stars provides a crucial information about the chemical evolution of our stellar system as a whole. Up to now we have not a final solution to the problem of the formation of the Milky Way - was it a hierarchical process from the large structure to the smaller substructures, or was our galaxy formed as a result of merging processes involving smaller stellar systems like dwarf galaxies and globular clusters?

The study of the chemical properties of the stars from different substructures of the Milky Way can shed light on this astrophysical enigma. Additionally, the study of chemical abundances of these stars (metal-poor stars and extremely metal-poor stars) gives us the key to understand which supernovae stars enriched the interstellar medium in the early stages of the Galaxy evolution, which physical characteristics are inherent in them, what are the masses of those stars and how they exploded. Today, great efforts are being made to conduct the large-scale study of the chemical properties of various galactic objects in order to recreate the holistic picture of the galaxy evolution.

This Research Topic aims to enrich our knowledge about the synthesis of various chemical elements in the galaxy and their distribution in various subsystems. We welcome authors to submit papers on the theory of chemical evolution of the galaxy.

In particular, we are looking for submissions that address how massive stars and intermediate-mass stars are responsible for the processes of nucleosynthesis. We also welcome contributions that explore the chemical properties of the stars that we see today and how the nuclei of various chemical elements were formed, in what processes and in what quantities.


Keywords: abundances, galaxy, chemical evolution


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..