Research Topic

Reciprocal Impacts: Human Behavior and Urban Resilience

About this Research Topic

Urban resilience, the ability of city systems and stakeholders to flourish in the face of chronic and acute stress, is emerging as a unifying construct for researchers and practitioners. It has become a rallying cry for cities across the globe (e.g., 100 Resilient Cities) as context becomes constrained by new ecological realities. Rapid urbanization has led to over half of the world’s population living in cities of over 50,000 residents. While concentrated populations in cities do not occupy a lot of territory, they account for the vast majority of consumption and, as a consequence, the related production of greenhouse gasses. Despite the long history of social scientists examining human experience in cities, the topic of coupled systems of ecological and social resilience in the face of a changing climate remains an under-studied area of importance for global stability.

This research topic in Frontiers in Sustainable Cities welcomes interdisciplinary research at the intersection of human behaviour and the urban environment. Human behaviour in the urban setting produces complex interdependencies among environmental (e.g., water, natural resources), built (e.g., energy, waste, economic), and social systems that operate at a civic and cultural level. In turn, each of these systems impact urban resilience and the possibility of sustainable human flourishing in urban settings. This special topic welcomes both theoretical and empirical work to build a broad understanding of the various processes and factors supporting resilience in cities.

We are calling for submissions that address transformation and urban resilience with a focus on the relationship between human behaviour, group behavior, and the resources and systems that support human well-being in urban settings. Examples include psychological, behavioural, and social factors in innovative resilience planning and design; mental processes related to risk management, conflict management, and resource use; or how decision making, leadership, worldviews, and attitudes affect the development, maintenance, and transformation of resilient cities.


Keywords: human behavior, social systems, group behavior, urban resilience, decision making


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Urban resilience, the ability of city systems and stakeholders to flourish in the face of chronic and acute stress, is emerging as a unifying construct for researchers and practitioners. It has become a rallying cry for cities across the globe (e.g., 100 Resilient Cities) as context becomes constrained by new ecological realities. Rapid urbanization has led to over half of the world’s population living in cities of over 50,000 residents. While concentrated populations in cities do not occupy a lot of territory, they account for the vast majority of consumption and, as a consequence, the related production of greenhouse gasses. Despite the long history of social scientists examining human experience in cities, the topic of coupled systems of ecological and social resilience in the face of a changing climate remains an under-studied area of importance for global stability.

This research topic in Frontiers in Sustainable Cities welcomes interdisciplinary research at the intersection of human behaviour and the urban environment. Human behaviour in the urban setting produces complex interdependencies among environmental (e.g., water, natural resources), built (e.g., energy, waste, economic), and social systems that operate at a civic and cultural level. In turn, each of these systems impact urban resilience and the possibility of sustainable human flourishing in urban settings. This special topic welcomes both theoretical and empirical work to build a broad understanding of the various processes and factors supporting resilience in cities.

We are calling for submissions that address transformation and urban resilience with a focus on the relationship between human behaviour, group behavior, and the resources and systems that support human well-being in urban settings. Examples include psychological, behavioural, and social factors in innovative resilience planning and design; mental processes related to risk management, conflict management, and resource use; or how decision making, leadership, worldviews, and attitudes affect the development, maintenance, and transformation of resilient cities.


Keywords: human behavior, social systems, group behavior, urban resilience, decision making


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

24 September 2019 Manuscript
24 October 2019 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

24 September 2019 Manuscript
24 October 2019 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top