Research Topic

Understanding the Stress of Resistance Training: Not as Simple as it Seems

About this Research Topic

Utilizing and interpreting valid metrics to quantify the training loads imposed on athletes is the cornerstone of any well-developed training monitoring strategy. This information can indicate whether athletes are responding appropriately to the demands of training and competition, which can help to ...

Utilizing and interpreting valid metrics to quantify the training loads imposed on athletes is the cornerstone of any well-developed training monitoring strategy. This information can indicate whether athletes are responding appropriately to the demands of training and competition, which can help to individualize the prescription of upcoming training. While methods to optimize the monitoring strategies for athletes have been extensively researched in recent years, these investigations typically focus on field-based sessions, and the stress imposed by resistance training is not well accounted for. This Research Topic will address various methodological approaches to measuring the training dose associated with resistance exercise.

Almost all athletes competing at high levels in their sport will undertake resistance training for performance improvements and/or injury prevention benefits, and these training sessions can impose a psychological, physical, and physiological burden. If the training loads associated with resistance exercise are not accounted for in a monitoring system, an important piece of the training load puzzle will be missing. However, identifying the characteristics of this missing puzzle piece can be difficult, due to the numerous exercise variables that impact on the training stress of resistance exercise (e.g. type of exercise, relative load lifted, training volume, inter-set rest periods, and repetition velocity). Traditional metrics to quantify training loads for resistance exercise include basic measurements of external workload and perceptual responses. However, with linear position transducer and accelerometer technology becoming more advanced and affordable, scientists we now have an opportunity to explore additional approaches to training monitoring.

An important factor to consider in any monitoring program though, is that by the time training load data have been assessed, the athlete has already trained. If the aim of monitoring is to inform decision making on training, traditional post hoc analysis cannot be used to optimize training as it occurs. To address this issue, researchers have recently began investigating various autoregulation strategies in resistance exercise. Using objective (e.g. velocity-based training and monitoring) and subjective (e.g. perceived repetitions in reserve) methods, it is possible to moderate the volume and load lifted during a training session.

The aims of this Research Topic are to shed light on strategies that can capture the stress of resistance training. Appropriate article topics can include, but are not limited to, measures of external volume and intensity, perceptual approaches, physiological assessments, and implementing various autoregulatory strategies to manage the training dose. Papers which take a comprehensive approach to training monitoring and incorporate the loads associated with other training activities (e.g. field- or court-based activities) are particularly encouraged.


Keywords: resistance training, training load, performance enhancement, training monitoring, elite sports


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

29 February 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

29 February 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..