Research Topic

Management of Arterial and Venous Thrombosis in Cancer Patients

About this Research Topic

Cancer is a well-established acquired thrombophilia that increases both venous and arterial thrombotic risk. Patients with cancer experience a 4–6-fold increase in rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population. The risk of VTE recurrence is as high as 15% per year and VTE is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with cancer face also a high short-term risk of arterial thromboembolism, particularly those with advance disease or aggressive cancer types. Arterial thromboembolism in cancer patients carries a 3-fold increased risk of death.

The individual risk for arterial and venous thrombotic events in cancer patients is determined by a complex interaction between multiple factors including baseline cardiovascular risk factors, cancer type and stage, the chemotherapeutic regimen and other general contributing factors for thrombosis. Patients with cancer are also at an increased risk for bleeding due to tumor invasion, frequent procedural interventions, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombocytopenia stemming from chemotherapy. Cancer patients are therefore at high risk for morbidity and mortality due to thrombosis and bleeding, in addition they may also have pre-existing conditions, such as a prior venous thromboembolic event or concomitant atrial fibrillation, for which chronic anticoagulation may be indicated.

These opposing risks lead to challenges in the selection of antithrombotic therapy for patients with cancer. Therapeutic options for arterial and venous thrombosis prophylaxis and treatment have expanded with the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants. While their safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in the general population, these data cannot be extrapolated to the oncology population.

This Research Topic will provide a comprehensive overview spacing from the molecular basis of cancer-associated thrombosis including the direct effect of chemotherapeutic agents on coagulation factors, thrombosis and vascular toxicity to the clinical aspect covering risk factors, prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thrombotic events outlining the most recent data on the new anticoagulant options. The Topic Editors welcome various types of articles, such as original research, review articles, and also other article types.


Keywords: Arterial Thrombosis, Thromboembolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Cardiovascular Disease Anticoagulants, Cancer, Prophylaxis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cancer is a well-established acquired thrombophilia that increases both venous and arterial thrombotic risk. Patients with cancer experience a 4–6-fold increase in rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE) compared with the general population. The risk of VTE recurrence is as high as 15% per year and VTE is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Patients with cancer face also a high short-term risk of arterial thromboembolism, particularly those with advance disease or aggressive cancer types. Arterial thromboembolism in cancer patients carries a 3-fold increased risk of death.

The individual risk for arterial and venous thrombotic events in cancer patients is determined by a complex interaction between multiple factors including baseline cardiovascular risk factors, cancer type and stage, the chemotherapeutic regimen and other general contributing factors for thrombosis. Patients with cancer are also at an increased risk for bleeding due to tumor invasion, frequent procedural interventions, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombocytopenia stemming from chemotherapy. Cancer patients are therefore at high risk for morbidity and mortality due to thrombosis and bleeding, in addition they may also have pre-existing conditions, such as a prior venous thromboembolic event or concomitant atrial fibrillation, for which chronic anticoagulation may be indicated.

These opposing risks lead to challenges in the selection of antithrombotic therapy for patients with cancer. Therapeutic options for arterial and venous thrombosis prophylaxis and treatment have expanded with the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants. While their safety and efficacy have been demonstrated in the general population, these data cannot be extrapolated to the oncology population.

This Research Topic will provide a comprehensive overview spacing from the molecular basis of cancer-associated thrombosis including the direct effect of chemotherapeutic agents on coagulation factors, thrombosis and vascular toxicity to the clinical aspect covering risk factors, prophylaxis and treatment of arterial and venous thrombotic events outlining the most recent data on the new anticoagulant options. The Topic Editors welcome various types of articles, such as original research, review articles, and also other article types.


Keywords: Arterial Thrombosis, Thromboembolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Cardiovascular Disease Anticoagulants, Cancer, Prophylaxis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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