Research Topic

New Molecular Pathways in Different Types of Heart Failure: Potential for Biomarker Development?

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

In the clinical setting, the use of biomarkers for risk prediction in patients with heart failure (HF) is common practice. Markers such as troponin T and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are of great importance in clinical decision making as well as for risk assessment. However, research on novel biomarkers is important for a better understanding of multiple cellurar pathways that are involved in HF (e.g. heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, HFrEF; or HF with preserved ejection fraction, HFpEF). When HF is accompanied with comorbities such as renal failure, diabetes or pulmonary hypertension, the prognosis could become even worse.

However, currently used biomarkers in clinical medicine only reflect a small spectrum of pathobiological axes, e.g. myocardial damage (troponin) or wall stress (BNP), but also structural changes, fibrosis and remodeling play a paramount role in the process of myocardial injury. Research on next generation biomarkers reflecting additional pathophysiologic pathways is therefore warranted paving the way for integrated clinical use of novel biomarkers assessing distinct pathophysiological pathways. Novel biomarkers may help assessing infarct size, myocardial dysfunction, extent of fibrosis and could help to predict clinical outcome. Further, biomarkers could be used to identify high-risk patients, plan individualized treatment and focus on secondary prevention strategies

Here, in this Research Topic, we seek to provide an overview of the current developments in the field of HF biomarker research, from molecular pathways, cellular communication up to the development and clinical use of biomarkers. We would request the submission of both basic science studies that investigate pathways or proteins that could be of interest for biomarker development (proteomics, next-generation sequencing) or clinical trials that assessed markers in a clinical setting (e.g. for diagnosis or risk prediction). Papers focusing on a translational approach would be of special interest. We would also like to provide a stage for research papers from other areas of biomarker research, e.g. large data base analyses (keyword: big data) or also from border areas of biomedicine (e.g. cost-effectiveness models) would be of special interest and very welcome. Moreover, in addition to basic science and clinical original papers, we endorse the submission of review articles and methodology papers.


Keywords: Biomarkers, Heart Failure, Vascular/Endothelial Stress, Risk Assessment, Proteomics, Next Generation Sequencing, Clinical Trials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the clinical setting, the use of biomarkers for risk prediction in patients with heart failure (HF) is common practice. Markers such as troponin T and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are of great importance in clinical decision making as well as for risk assessment. However, research on novel biomarkers is important for a better understanding of multiple cellurar pathways that are involved in HF (e.g. heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, HFrEF; or HF with preserved ejection fraction, HFpEF). When HF is accompanied with comorbities such as renal failure, diabetes or pulmonary hypertension, the prognosis could become even worse.

However, currently used biomarkers in clinical medicine only reflect a small spectrum of pathobiological axes, e.g. myocardial damage (troponin) or wall stress (BNP), but also structural changes, fibrosis and remodeling play a paramount role in the process of myocardial injury. Research on next generation biomarkers reflecting additional pathophysiologic pathways is therefore warranted paving the way for integrated clinical use of novel biomarkers assessing distinct pathophysiological pathways. Novel biomarkers may help assessing infarct size, myocardial dysfunction, extent of fibrosis and could help to predict clinical outcome. Further, biomarkers could be used to identify high-risk patients, plan individualized treatment and focus on secondary prevention strategies

Here, in this Research Topic, we seek to provide an overview of the current developments in the field of HF biomarker research, from molecular pathways, cellular communication up to the development and clinical use of biomarkers. We would request the submission of both basic science studies that investigate pathways or proteins that could be of interest for biomarker development (proteomics, next-generation sequencing) or clinical trials that assessed markers in a clinical setting (e.g. for diagnosis or risk prediction). Papers focusing on a translational approach would be of special interest. We would also like to provide a stage for research papers from other areas of biomarker research, e.g. large data base analyses (keyword: big data) or also from border areas of biomedicine (e.g. cost-effectiveness models) would be of special interest and very welcome. Moreover, in addition to basic science and clinical original papers, we endorse the submission of review articles and methodology papers.


Keywords: Biomarkers, Heart Failure, Vascular/Endothelial Stress, Risk Assessment, Proteomics, Next Generation Sequencing, Clinical Trials


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..