Research Topic

Revisiting the Legacy of John Snow and the Art of In-Field Outbreak Investigation

About this Research Topic

It has been more than 150 years since John Snow’s investigation of the Broad street cholera outbreak in London. Snow demonstrated how an outbreak scenario enables the analysis of a unique experiment set by nature, revealing insights into how the disease may be controlled. The investigation of outbreaks offers an opportunity to explore risk factors for morbidity and mortality, determine the source of infection or the causative agent of an infection, assess vaccine effectiveness, determine economical/production losses caused by a disease and follow transmission dynamics.

As such it comprises a fundamental component of veterinary epidemiology, and its publication should be encouraged. Here, we welcome the submission of case-reports or original research articles that describe in detail the investigation of an outbreak or offer a perspective of outbreak investigation of transmissible animal diseases or zoonoses among human and animal populations.

We primarily encourage the submission of articles of the following types:
- Articles describing outbreak investigations which include observational analytical studies. Such investigations should rely on both clinical and laboratory based case definitions. The use of novel analytical and modelling methods is encouraged if appropriate but is not a prerequisite. In these types of article, the finding and its biological application should stand at the center of the article and not the methodology.
- Short descriptions of outbreaks describing an animal or zoonotic disease which is exceptional due to: a) the occurrence of a new pathogen; b) the occurrence of an outbreak in a new location; c) involvement of a new host; or d) a description of a possible new mode of transmission or pathogen exposure. Such articles need not necessarily be analytical, they should include a description in terms of pathogen, host, time and space.
- Review articles describing new methodologies or trends in outbreak investigation.
- Review of routine methods of outbreak investigation used when controlling an outbreak of a notifiable animal disease/zoonosis using established methods – this should consider the various objectives and challenges considered by government veterinary services during an outbreak investigation, including epidemiological, economic as well as pragmatic, legal or managerial aspects of outbreak control. This could be done as a general review or a description of a specific epidemic, illustrating and discussing these aspects.
- Meta-analyses of a specific risk factors for infection by animal/zoonotic diseases or vaccine effectiveness analyzed by outbreak investigations.


Keywords: Outbreak Investigation, Epidemics, Vaccine Effectiveness, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Emerging Diseases, Re-Emerging Diseases, Risk Factors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

It has been more than 150 years since John Snow’s investigation of the Broad street cholera outbreak in London. Snow demonstrated how an outbreak scenario enables the analysis of a unique experiment set by nature, revealing insights into how the disease may be controlled. The investigation of outbreaks offers an opportunity to explore risk factors for morbidity and mortality, determine the source of infection or the causative agent of an infection, assess vaccine effectiveness, determine economical/production losses caused by a disease and follow transmission dynamics.

As such it comprises a fundamental component of veterinary epidemiology, and its publication should be encouraged. Here, we welcome the submission of case-reports or original research articles that describe in detail the investigation of an outbreak or offer a perspective of outbreak investigation of transmissible animal diseases or zoonoses among human and animal populations.

We primarily encourage the submission of articles of the following types:
- Articles describing outbreak investigations which include observational analytical studies. Such investigations should rely on both clinical and laboratory based case definitions. The use of novel analytical and modelling methods is encouraged if appropriate but is not a prerequisite. In these types of article, the finding and its biological application should stand at the center of the article and not the methodology.
- Short descriptions of outbreaks describing an animal or zoonotic disease which is exceptional due to: a) the occurrence of a new pathogen; b) the occurrence of an outbreak in a new location; c) involvement of a new host; or d) a description of a possible new mode of transmission or pathogen exposure. Such articles need not necessarily be analytical, they should include a description in terms of pathogen, host, time and space.
- Review articles describing new methodologies or trends in outbreak investigation.
- Review of routine methods of outbreak investigation used when controlling an outbreak of a notifiable animal disease/zoonosis using established methods – this should consider the various objectives and challenges considered by government veterinary services during an outbreak investigation, including epidemiological, economic as well as pragmatic, legal or managerial aspects of outbreak control. This could be done as a general review or a description of a specific epidemic, illustrating and discussing these aspects.
- Meta-analyses of a specific risk factors for infection by animal/zoonotic diseases or vaccine effectiveness analyzed by outbreak investigations.


Keywords: Outbreak Investigation, Epidemics, Vaccine Effectiveness, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Emerging Diseases, Re-Emerging Diseases, Risk Factors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

06 January 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

06 January 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top