Research Topic

Sleep and Circadian Disruption in Critically Ill Patients

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Sleep and circadian processes are severely disrupted in critically ill patients. Sleep in the intensive care unit (ICU) is shorter than normal, predominantly “light” (i.e., stage N1 or N2), and much of it occurs during the day. Circadian alignment and amplitude are also disrupted in the ICU, particularly in ...

Sleep and circadian processes are severely disrupted in critically ill patients. Sleep in the intensive care unit (ICU) is shorter than normal, predominantly “light” (i.e., stage N1 or N2), and much of it occurs during the day. Circadian alignment and amplitude are also disrupted in the ICU, particularly in septic patients. These sleep and circadian disruptions likely result from a large array of factors including, but not limited to the following: individual patient characteristics (risk factors), acute critical illness, the hospital environment, and medical treatment effects. Acute sleep and circadian disruption are known to cause significant cognitive, metabolic, immune and cardiovascular derangements in animal and human models. It is hypothesized that sleep and circadian disruption are significant contributors to ICU delirium and other ICU outcomes.

Though sleep and circadian disruption are increasingly recognized as an important ICU problem, there remain many unknowns in this area of active investigation. It is our goal to (1) improve understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of sleep and circadian disruption in critically ill patients; (2) identify modifiable factors in the development of sleep and circadian disruption; (3) establish the impact of sleep and circadian disruption on ICU outcomes; and (4) evaluate treatment modalities for sleep and circadian disruption in ICU patients.

We are seeking original research articles that address the above listed goals. Of interest are articles relevant to the following themes as they relate to sleep and / or circadian disruption (SCD) in critically ill patients:

• Pre-hospital risk factors for the development of SCD
• Critical illness related risk factors for the development of SCD
• Hospital environmental factors contributing to the development of SCD
• The impact of SCD on metabolic, immune and cardiovascular function
• The impact of SCD on ICU delirium
• Non-pharmacologic treatment of SCD
• Pharmacologic treatment of SCD
• SCD related critical illness outcomes
• Tools to measure SCD in the ICU setting

Articles including medical, cardiac, surgical, neurologic, and pediatric ICUS are welcome.


Keywords: sleep, circadian, delirium, critical illness


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..