Research Topic

Bone Inside-Out and Outside-In Signals: Control of Body Homeostasis

About this Research Topic

Bone mass is controlled by the coordinated actions of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, cells that form and resorb bone, respectively. It is now clear that the actions of these two cell types, as well as their differentiation from the corresponding precursor cells, is modulated by osteocytes, the cells embedded in ...

Bone mass is controlled by the coordinated actions of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, cells that form and resorb bone, respectively. It is now clear that the actions of these two cell types, as well as their differentiation from the corresponding precursor cells, is modulated by osteocytes, the cells embedded in the bone matrix. Recent findings indicate that in addition to their role in controlling bone mass, bone cells act as endocrine cells, and all cells produce factors able to regulate the function of distal organs, including muscle, pancreas, kidney and brain, among others. Conversely, hormones and growth factors produced by cells, other tissues are able to modulate bone modeling and remodeling by altering osteoblast, osteoclast and osteocyte functions. Further, more recently studies provided evidence for a role of the gut microbiome on bone homeostasis. Understanding the molecular signature of bone cells, and how these cells are affected by circulating factors has provided new means to treat conditions with altered bone mass and strength.

The purpose of this Research Topic Issue is to discuss all these aspects of bone interactions with other tissues, both inside-out (from bone cells to other organs) and outside-in (from other cells/tissues to bone cells). Articles should address the above-mentioned aspects of bone biology, within the categories listed below. However, authors are encouraged to submit manuscript that will address some aspect of the interactions of bone with other tissues not comprised within the following categories.

1. Regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation
2. Direct versus indirect effects of mechanical stimulation in bone (by indirect, I mean the potential contribution of skeletal muscle and nervous system to the effect of mechanical stimulation on bone)
3. regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity
4. effect of resorption-released products on other organs (TGFβ and muscle, for example)
5. Regulation of osteoblast differentiation and activity
6. Effect of osteoblastic products on other organs
7. Role of the digestive track (including microbiome) on the control of bone mass and strength.
8. Inflammation and bone
9. Control of osteocyte differentiation
10. Role of osteocytic products on other organs

Reviews, hypothesis and theory, and original research articles are welcome.


Keywords: Osteoblast, Osteocyte, Osteoclast, Bone Mass, Homeostasis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Manuscript
31 July 2020 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 May 2020 Manuscript
31 July 2020 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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