Research Topic

Integrated Approaches to Bridge Long-Term Tectonics and Earthquake Cycles

About this Research Topic

Long-term tectonic processes shape the bulk conditions under which rocks and faults operate and thereby influence earthquake processes on short time scales. Observations allow us to define fundamental hypotheses that can be tested by way of experiments and models, ultimately yielding deeper insights into mechanics of faulting in nature. Inter-, co-, and post-seismic deformation can be documented geodetically, but the sparseness of the data and its large spatial and temporal variability do not sufficiently resolve their driving mechanisms.

Laboratory experiments under controlled conditions can narrow down the possibilities, while numerical modeling helps extrapolating these results back to natural conditions. Thus, integrated approaches to bridge long-term tectonics and the earthquake cycle that combine observation, interpretation, experimentation, and finally, physical or numerical modeling, are key for our understanding of the deformation behavior of complex fault systems. This Research Topic seeks contributions toward an integrated perspective on the earthquake cycle that span a wide range of observations, methodologies, and modeling over a variety of spatial and temporal scales.

We encourage contributions covering brittle and ductile deformation, from microstructures to mantle rheology and with applications to earthquake mechanics, geodynamics, geodesy, and more. Specific questions include:

- How do long-term crustal and lithospheric deformation affect short-term seismicity and earthquake cycle behavior?
- What is the long-term topographic signature of the earthquake?
- What are the relative contributions of rheology and geometry for seismic and aseismic slip?
- What are the roles of on- and off-fault deformation in shaping the landscape and partitioning seismic and aseismic energy dissipation?

Cover Image credit: Dr. Thomas P. Ferrand (UC San Diego). Modified after Kita and Ferrand (2018).


Keywords: earthquake cycle, brittle deformation, ductile deformation, earthquake mechanics, lithospheric deformation, short-term seismicity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Long-term tectonic processes shape the bulk conditions under which rocks and faults operate and thereby influence earthquake processes on short time scales. Observations allow us to define fundamental hypotheses that can be tested by way of experiments and models, ultimately yielding deeper insights into mechanics of faulting in nature. Inter-, co-, and post-seismic deformation can be documented geodetically, but the sparseness of the data and its large spatial and temporal variability do not sufficiently resolve their driving mechanisms.

Laboratory experiments under controlled conditions can narrow down the possibilities, while numerical modeling helps extrapolating these results back to natural conditions. Thus, integrated approaches to bridge long-term tectonics and the earthquake cycle that combine observation, interpretation, experimentation, and finally, physical or numerical modeling, are key for our understanding of the deformation behavior of complex fault systems. This Research Topic seeks contributions toward an integrated perspective on the earthquake cycle that span a wide range of observations, methodologies, and modeling over a variety of spatial and temporal scales.

We encourage contributions covering brittle and ductile deformation, from microstructures to mantle rheology and with applications to earthquake mechanics, geodynamics, geodesy, and more. Specific questions include:

- How do long-term crustal and lithospheric deformation affect short-term seismicity and earthquake cycle behavior?
- What is the long-term topographic signature of the earthquake?
- What are the relative contributions of rheology and geometry for seismic and aseismic slip?
- What are the roles of on- and off-fault deformation in shaping the landscape and partitioning seismic and aseismic energy dissipation?

Cover Image credit: Dr. Thomas P. Ferrand (UC San Diego). Modified after Kita and Ferrand (2018).


Keywords: earthquake cycle, brittle deformation, ductile deformation, earthquake mechanics, lithospheric deformation, short-term seismicity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

25 February 2020 Abstract
25 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

25 February 2020 Abstract
25 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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