Research Topic

Big Data for understanding tropical ecosystem services

About this Research Topic

Ecosystems provide a variety of services to society, including carbon storage, biodiversity, water provision and purification, and many more. However, human pressures from land-use change, resource extraction, and climate change are straining these common-pool resources in many locations. These pressures are particularly critical in the tropics, the location of a majority of the world’s carbon storage and biodiversity, and more than 40% of the global population. At the same time, relative to non-tropical regions on earth, this vast region is poorly observed and poorly understood. Big data observations from remote sensing, as well as outputs from modeling tools constrained by observations, can fill the gaps between sparse on-the-ground measurements and provide invaluable information in supporting sustainable resource management and ecosystem service provision.
This Article Collection seeks to better understand ecosystem service changes in the tropics using big data. Studies that examine the interactions between anthropogenic disturbance, climate change and response variables related to ecosystem service delivery to people are particularly encouraged. Recognizing that ecosystem service challenges vary regionally, articles must not have a pan-tropical focus. We would welcome both studies using high-resolution remote sensing data to document changes occurring, as well as modeling studies to understand the impact of various disturbance types or management practices in driving observed changes. Papers for this Article Collection should be driven by multiple observational datasets, such as combinations of remote sensing and in situ observations, multiple types of remote sensing datasets, or data fusion approaches that combine modeling and remote sensing. Examples of topics of interest relevant to this Article Collection could include, but are not limited to:
- Overpumping of groundwater (e.g. in India)
- Drainage and deforestation of peatlands (e.g. in Insular Southeast Asia)
- Habitat loss associated with land-use change
- Drivers of spatial changes in biodiversity, such as road construction or mining
- Effects of climate and land-use change on flooding and water resources
- Community-based common-pool resource management
- Increasing coastal vulnerability and land loss because of mangrove degradation
- Impacts of land-use change on water quality, e.g., in terms of suspended solids


Keywords: big data, ecosystem services, water provision, land-use, tropics, climate change, remote sensing data, on-the-ground measurements


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Ecosystems provide a variety of services to society, including carbon storage, biodiversity, water provision and purification, and many more. However, human pressures from land-use change, resource extraction, and climate change are straining these common-pool resources in many locations. These pressures are particularly critical in the tropics, the location of a majority of the world’s carbon storage and biodiversity, and more than 40% of the global population. At the same time, relative to non-tropical regions on earth, this vast region is poorly observed and poorly understood. Big data observations from remote sensing, as well as outputs from modeling tools constrained by observations, can fill the gaps between sparse on-the-ground measurements and provide invaluable information in supporting sustainable resource management and ecosystem service provision.
This Article Collection seeks to better understand ecosystem service changes in the tropics using big data. Studies that examine the interactions between anthropogenic disturbance, climate change and response variables related to ecosystem service delivery to people are particularly encouraged. Recognizing that ecosystem service challenges vary regionally, articles must not have a pan-tropical focus. We would welcome both studies using high-resolution remote sensing data to document changes occurring, as well as modeling studies to understand the impact of various disturbance types or management practices in driving observed changes. Papers for this Article Collection should be driven by multiple observational datasets, such as combinations of remote sensing and in situ observations, multiple types of remote sensing datasets, or data fusion approaches that combine modeling and remote sensing. Examples of topics of interest relevant to this Article Collection could include, but are not limited to:
- Overpumping of groundwater (e.g. in India)
- Drainage and deforestation of peatlands (e.g. in Insular Southeast Asia)
- Habitat loss associated with land-use change
- Drivers of spatial changes in biodiversity, such as road construction or mining
- Effects of climate and land-use change on flooding and water resources
- Community-based common-pool resource management
- Increasing coastal vulnerability and land loss because of mangrove degradation
- Impacts of land-use change on water quality, e.g., in terms of suspended solids


Keywords: big data, ecosystem services, water provision, land-use, tropics, climate change, remote sensing data, on-the-ground measurements


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

01 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..