Research Topic

Quantitative Reconstruction of Continental Holocene Temperature

About this Research Topic

Continental climate variability during the Holocene Epoch is important for all aspects of civilization and society development, not only because human civilization was developed on the continents, but also because of the highly heterogenous patterns of continental climate change. There are many unresolved questions for the Holocene temperature change. For example, it remains controversial how temperature changed during the Holocene as there exists discrepancy between temperature reconstructions and climate modelling results, which is called the Holocene temperature conundrum.

The temperature conundrum likely results from the seasonal biases in temperature reconstructions, and potentially unexplained uncertainties in the climate models. Various proxies have been adopted for quantitative temperature reconstructions, including pollen, alkenone, GDGTs, chironomidae, etc. Each proxy has its inherent response to temperature, which makes the reconstructed temperature records may capture different seasonality. Furthermore, transfer functions for a specific proxy vary significantly in different regions, which likely bring unexpected uncertainties during temperature synthesis. Recent developments of new proxies, such as di-ols, clumped isotopes, will bring more opportunities to quantitative temperature reconstructions.

Furthermore, it has been reported that high latitude temperature variability is more evident than low latitudes, however, there is a lack to assess the altitude effect on the temperature variability. More quantitative temperature records based on various proxies across the world’s continents are essentially required to understand global patterns of Holocene temperature variation.

In this Research Topic, we welcome quantitative temperature records based on various proxies in continents to understand the temperature variability around the world. We welcome quantitative Holocene temperature reconstructions from continental archives (lake, peat, speleothem, ice core etc) using various proxies, including biomarkers, pollen, midge, isotopes, with well-defined temperature implications. The records should have good chronological controls, with decadal- to centennial- scale resolution. We also welcome updated calibrations for various proxies in different regions.

Cover Image taken by Prof. Jianhui Chen at Lake Kanas, Xinjiang, China in 2012


Keywords: Holocene, Continental temperature, Quantitative, temperature reconstruction, proxies


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Continental climate variability during the Holocene Epoch is important for all aspects of civilization and society development, not only because human civilization was developed on the continents, but also because of the highly heterogenous patterns of continental climate change. There are many unresolved questions for the Holocene temperature change. For example, it remains controversial how temperature changed during the Holocene as there exists discrepancy between temperature reconstructions and climate modelling results, which is called the Holocene temperature conundrum.

The temperature conundrum likely results from the seasonal biases in temperature reconstructions, and potentially unexplained uncertainties in the climate models. Various proxies have been adopted for quantitative temperature reconstructions, including pollen, alkenone, GDGTs, chironomidae, etc. Each proxy has its inherent response to temperature, which makes the reconstructed temperature records may capture different seasonality. Furthermore, transfer functions for a specific proxy vary significantly in different regions, which likely bring unexpected uncertainties during temperature synthesis. Recent developments of new proxies, such as di-ols, clumped isotopes, will bring more opportunities to quantitative temperature reconstructions.

Furthermore, it has been reported that high latitude temperature variability is more evident than low latitudes, however, there is a lack to assess the altitude effect on the temperature variability. More quantitative temperature records based on various proxies across the world’s continents are essentially required to understand global patterns of Holocene temperature variation.

In this Research Topic, we welcome quantitative temperature records based on various proxies in continents to understand the temperature variability around the world. We welcome quantitative Holocene temperature reconstructions from continental archives (lake, peat, speleothem, ice core etc) using various proxies, including biomarkers, pollen, midge, isotopes, with well-defined temperature implications. The records should have good chronological controls, with decadal- to centennial- scale resolution. We also welcome updated calibrations for various proxies in different regions.

Cover Image taken by Prof. Jianhui Chen at Lake Kanas, Xinjiang, China in 2012


Keywords: Holocene, Continental temperature, Quantitative, temperature reconstruction, proxies


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

06 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

06 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..