Research Topic

3D printing: shaping biomaterials

About this Research Topic

3D printing by using selected biomaterials as "inks" to obtain shaped and functional devices is a reality. Lab-scale equipment are being translated into industrial and the availability of everyday new inks is increasing the field of application. Thus, the development of new 3D techniques for biomedical application has different priorities: 1) the design of new inks with established properties balanced between biocompatibility, physicochemical properties such as viscosity, low chemical reactivity and commercial availability, 2) the development of new hardening techniques for the inks including in-process crosslinking, 3) the expansion of the fields of application by merging skills from different disciplines. In this way, engineers should talk with chemist, biologists, pharmacists and physicians.

This research topic is aimed at collecting the research experiences from different biomedical fields of researchers working on 3D printing with the aim to design and prepare new biomaterials for regenerative medicine, cell encapsulation, drug delivery, diagnostic, organ replacement, nerve reconstruction or in the use as bioreactors.


Keywords: 3D printing, biomaterials, bio ink, cell inclusion, drug delivery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

3D printing by using selected biomaterials as "inks" to obtain shaped and functional devices is a reality. Lab-scale equipment are being translated into industrial and the availability of everyday new inks is increasing the field of application. Thus, the development of new 3D techniques for biomedical application has different priorities: 1) the design of new inks with established properties balanced between biocompatibility, physicochemical properties such as viscosity, low chemical reactivity and commercial availability, 2) the development of new hardening techniques for the inks including in-process crosslinking, 3) the expansion of the fields of application by merging skills from different disciplines. In this way, engineers should talk with chemist, biologists, pharmacists and physicians.

This research topic is aimed at collecting the research experiences from different biomedical fields of researchers working on 3D printing with the aim to design and prepare new biomaterials for regenerative medicine, cell encapsulation, drug delivery, diagnostic, organ replacement, nerve reconstruction or in the use as bioreactors.


Keywords: 3D printing, biomaterials, bio ink, cell inclusion, drug delivery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

24 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

24 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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