Research Topic

New Analytical Methods Constraining the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Large Scale Mineralization in China

About this Research Topic

China, which is endowed with a large number of world-class metallic mineral deposits, has become first in the world since 2003, for total metal production of gold, zinc, lead, molybdenum, iron ore, tin, tungsten, rare earths, vanadium, and antimony, and holds second place in mine production of copper, silver, cobalt, and manganese. One striking feature is that large scale mineralization in China primarily occurred during Mesozoic-Cenozoic periods. The corresponding geological events include the crustal thinning of eastern China in response to the subduction of paleo-Pacific Plate, the final closure of paleo-Asian Ocean, and the formation of the Tibet plateau resulting from closing of Tethys. The four important metallogenic provinces are North China, South China, Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and Tibet plateau.

The combined affects from paleo-Asian Ocean, paleo-Pacific Plate and Tethys during Mesozoic-Cenozoic periods on the blocks in China make it difficult to precisely define the regional metallogenic setting. In addition, it is hard to exactly determine the origin of mineral deposits because there are various specific factors, including (1) a cyclical enrichment of mineralizing fluids with metals derived from source region, (2) efficient transfer of metals from source to deposition site, (3) selective metal precipitation in a confined space, and (4) right preservation condition after ore formation. Recently, the fast development of new methods was applied in ore deposits, including high-precision dating method on garnet, rutile, sericite, rutile, zircon, apatite, and molybdenite, microanalysis of single fluid or melt inclusion in quartz, other silicate minerals (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, garnet, and apatite) and opaque minerals (e.g., pyrite, wolframite, and cassiterite), In situ elemental concentration and isotope ratios of silicate minerals (e.g., chlorite, epidote, mica, zircon, and apatite), oxide minerals (e.g., magnetite) and sulfide minerals (e.g., pyrite), and non-traditional metal stable isotopes (e.g., Fe, Cu, Mo, Sn, and Ag). Thus, it is currently possible to precisely measure and understand the mineralization age, metallogenic setting, features of source region, metal precipitation mechanism, and ore-forming process of Mesozoic-Cenozoic mineral deposits in China using the newly developed approaches.

We welcome Original Research articles on any topic associated with mineral deposits in various metallogenic regimes in China using recently developed cutting-edge approaches. Review articles are also welcome.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):
- The Fe-Au-Cu-Mo-Diamond ore-forming process and geodynamic setting in North China;
- The W-Sn-Cu-Au-Mo-Nb-Ta-Sb-U-V mineralization features and controlling factors in South China;
- The Cu-Au-Mo-Sn-Ag-REE-U mineralization process, potentials and implications for exploration in CAOB;
- The controlling factors of the large scale Cu-Au-Pb-Zn-Mo mineralization in Tibet plateau;
- New analytical methods on mineral deposits; and
- Reviewing regional mineralization and related tectonic evolution.


Keywords: Ore-forming process, Mineral Deposit, Mesozoic-Cenozoic, China, New analytical method


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

China, which is endowed with a large number of world-class metallic mineral deposits, has become first in the world since 2003, for total metal production of gold, zinc, lead, molybdenum, iron ore, tin, tungsten, rare earths, vanadium, and antimony, and holds second place in mine production of copper, silver, cobalt, and manganese. One striking feature is that large scale mineralization in China primarily occurred during Mesozoic-Cenozoic periods. The corresponding geological events include the crustal thinning of eastern China in response to the subduction of paleo-Pacific Plate, the final closure of paleo-Asian Ocean, and the formation of the Tibet plateau resulting from closing of Tethys. The four important metallogenic provinces are North China, South China, Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and Tibet plateau.

The combined affects from paleo-Asian Ocean, paleo-Pacific Plate and Tethys during Mesozoic-Cenozoic periods on the blocks in China make it difficult to precisely define the regional metallogenic setting. In addition, it is hard to exactly determine the origin of mineral deposits because there are various specific factors, including (1) a cyclical enrichment of mineralizing fluids with metals derived from source region, (2) efficient transfer of metals from source to deposition site, (3) selective metal precipitation in a confined space, and (4) right preservation condition after ore formation. Recently, the fast development of new methods was applied in ore deposits, including high-precision dating method on garnet, rutile, sericite, rutile, zircon, apatite, and molybdenite, microanalysis of single fluid or melt inclusion in quartz, other silicate minerals (e.g., olivine, pyroxene, garnet, and apatite) and opaque minerals (e.g., pyrite, wolframite, and cassiterite), In situ elemental concentration and isotope ratios of silicate minerals (e.g., chlorite, epidote, mica, zircon, and apatite), oxide minerals (e.g., magnetite) and sulfide minerals (e.g., pyrite), and non-traditional metal stable isotopes (e.g., Fe, Cu, Mo, Sn, and Ag). Thus, it is currently possible to precisely measure and understand the mineralization age, metallogenic setting, features of source region, metal precipitation mechanism, and ore-forming process of Mesozoic-Cenozoic mineral deposits in China using the newly developed approaches.

We welcome Original Research articles on any topic associated with mineral deposits in various metallogenic regimes in China using recently developed cutting-edge approaches. Review articles are also welcome.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to):
- The Fe-Au-Cu-Mo-Diamond ore-forming process and geodynamic setting in North China;
- The W-Sn-Cu-Au-Mo-Nb-Ta-Sb-U-V mineralization features and controlling factors in South China;
- The Cu-Au-Mo-Sn-Ag-REE-U mineralization process, potentials and implications for exploration in CAOB;
- The controlling factors of the large scale Cu-Au-Pb-Zn-Mo mineralization in Tibet plateau;
- New analytical methods on mineral deposits; and
- Reviewing regional mineralization and related tectonic evolution.


Keywords: Ore-forming process, Mineral Deposit, Mesozoic-Cenozoic, China, New analytical method


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 September 2020 Manuscript

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Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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