Research Topic

Natural Bioactives and Inflammation

About this Research Topic

There is significant need in biology today to moderate and control inflammation. Increased inflammation is associated with decline in mobility, joint problems, weakened muscles and bones, reduced lean body mass, increased dermatological problems, decline in cognition, reduced energy use, decreased immune function, decreased renal function, urinary incontinence, and cancer. Each of these conditions presents a unique opportunity for nutritional intervention with biologically active compounds that would help control the pro-inflammatory signals (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein). In particular, many natural botanicals have bioactive components that appear to have robust anti-inflammatory effects and, when included in the food, may contribute to a reduction in inflammation.

This series will present articles that evaluate natural botanicals and bioactive components with the goal of influencing the inflammatory response in vitro or in nonhuman animals to moderate it for the benefit of the host. The range of articles from the biological responses measured in cell culture systems (to better understand the foundational effects on the cellular level) to the whole animal response (using nonhuman animals to evaluate the true in vivo value associated with these biologically active compounds) which will enhance our understanding of this exciting research area. The Research Topic will highlight dietary factors including polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables, and herbs, as well as foods rich in ω-3 fatty acids, with the goal of evaluating their beneficial effects in reducing systemic inflammation.

Articles in this Research Topic should evaluate the effects of biologically active foods or foodstuffs (including ω-3 fatty acids, polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables, herbs and biologically impactful and characterized extracts) in cellular systems and nonhuman animals.

They will fit into the following areas:

-Evaluations of in vitro responses such as cellular production of cytokines and inflammatory signals and cellular energy use.

-Studies involving in vivo responses such as changes in aging and health during aging in their dermatological condition, cognition, energy use, immune function, renal function, and urinary tract condition.

-Articles detailing a botanical composition that produces an antiinflammatory response and structures activity relationships, as well as methodologies to evaluate the bioactive compounds.

-Investigations of specific naturally occurring disease conditions (i.e., diseases of the skin, brain, kidney, and urinary tract) as influenced by these biologically active compounds.


Topic Editor Dennis Jewell has been an employee of Hill's Pet Nutrition, that makes products that use biologicals to control the inflammatory process. Topic Editor Kiran Panickar also works for Hill's Pet Nutrition. All other Topic Editors declare no conflicts of interest.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

There is significant need in biology today to moderate and control inflammation. Increased inflammation is associated with decline in mobility, joint problems, weakened muscles and bones, reduced lean body mass, increased dermatological problems, decline in cognition, reduced energy use, decreased immune function, decreased renal function, urinary incontinence, and cancer. Each of these conditions presents a unique opportunity for nutritional intervention with biologically active compounds that would help control the pro-inflammatory signals (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, IL-1β, and C-reactive protein). In particular, many natural botanicals have bioactive components that appear to have robust anti-inflammatory effects and, when included in the food, may contribute to a reduction in inflammation.

This series will present articles that evaluate natural botanicals and bioactive components with the goal of influencing the inflammatory response in vitro or in nonhuman animals to moderate it for the benefit of the host. The range of articles from the biological responses measured in cell culture systems (to better understand the foundational effects on the cellular level) to the whole animal response (using nonhuman animals to evaluate the true in vivo value associated with these biologically active compounds) which will enhance our understanding of this exciting research area. The Research Topic will highlight dietary factors including polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables, and herbs, as well as foods rich in ω-3 fatty acids, with the goal of evaluating their beneficial effects in reducing systemic inflammation.

Articles in this Research Topic should evaluate the effects of biologically active foods or foodstuffs (including ω-3 fatty acids, polyphenol-rich fruits, vegetables, herbs and biologically impactful and characterized extracts) in cellular systems and nonhuman animals.

They will fit into the following areas:

-Evaluations of in vitro responses such as cellular production of cytokines and inflammatory signals and cellular energy use.

-Studies involving in vivo responses such as changes in aging and health during aging in their dermatological condition, cognition, energy use, immune function, renal function, and urinary tract condition.

-Articles detailing a botanical composition that produces an antiinflammatory response and structures activity relationships, as well as methodologies to evaluate the bioactive compounds.

-Investigations of specific naturally occurring disease conditions (i.e., diseases of the skin, brain, kidney, and urinary tract) as influenced by these biologically active compounds.


Topic Editor Dennis Jewell has been an employee of Hill's Pet Nutrition, that makes products that use biologicals to control the inflammatory process. Topic Editor Kiran Panickar also works for Hill's Pet Nutrition. All other Topic Editors declare no conflicts of interest.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

04 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

04 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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