Research Topic

Sensing and Signaling Networks of Temperature Stresses in Animals

About this Research Topic

Temperature is a major factor in the lives of animals, especially ectotherms. It affects the rate of enzymatic reactions as well as the structure and function of macromolecules like nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Fluctuations in environmental temperature can disrupt the homeostasis established in animal tissues and cells. Responses and acclimation to varying temperature are important for an animal’s health and survival. Thus far, molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing and signaling networks of temperature stresses in animals are not well known. Identification and characterization of the sensors, transducers, key regulators, biological processes, signaling pathways, and gene expression programs involved in the development of resistance to temperature stresses are important for understanding the genetics, molecular biology, and developmental biology of animals.

In this Research Topic, authors are encouraged to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing and signaling processes elicited by temperature stress in animals ranging from worms to vertebrates. Organisms acclimate to changing temperatures by reshaping their transcriptome and proteome through complex transcriptional and translational regulations. Transcriptomic profiling can be performed to explore the changes in gene transcription and transcript isoform compositions under different thermal conditions. Proteomic approaches can be utilized to characterize the regulation of proteins and post-translational modifications upon temperature stresses, especially the modifications intimately associated with signal transduction. Comparative genomic analysis can be conducted to uncover the effects of genetic diversity on the response and resistance to temperature stresses. Epigenetics methods are encouraged to reveal functions of DNA and histone modifications in the control of signaling pathways associated with temperature stresses. Functions of key regulators during these processes can be characterized in cell lines and experimental animals by generating knockout models using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. From a systems biology perspective, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks based on the results of “-omics” and gene function studies can be generated to deepen the understanding of the genetic basis for temperature stress response and acclimation.

This Research Topic welcomes, but is not limited to, the following subtopics:
• Genetic basis that determines the resistance and acclimation to temperature stresses in animal models.
• The contribution of genetic diversity in populations to temperature responses.
• The key factors that regulate the gene expression programs elicited by temperature stresses and the corresponding molecular mechanisms.
• Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA and histone modifications that regulate the response and resistance to temperature stresses.
• Effects of RNA splicing, RNA editing, and RNA secondary structures that are favored upon changed temperature.
• Proteomics (e.g., quantitative and phosphorus proteomics) to investigate the regulation events upon temperature stress at the peptide level.
• Comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics to understand temperature stress responses in different animal species or different strains of the same species.


Keywords: temperature stress, stress response, gene expression regulation, signal transduction, signalling networks


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Temperature is a major factor in the lives of animals, especially ectotherms. It affects the rate of enzymatic reactions as well as the structure and function of macromolecules like nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates. Fluctuations in environmental temperature can disrupt the homeostasis established in animal tissues and cells. Responses and acclimation to varying temperature are important for an animal’s health and survival. Thus far, molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing and signaling networks of temperature stresses in animals are not well known. Identification and characterization of the sensors, transducers, key regulators, biological processes, signaling pathways, and gene expression programs involved in the development of resistance to temperature stresses are important for understanding the genetics, molecular biology, and developmental biology of animals.

In this Research Topic, authors are encouraged to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying the sensing and signaling processes elicited by temperature stress in animals ranging from worms to vertebrates. Organisms acclimate to changing temperatures by reshaping their transcriptome and proteome through complex transcriptional and translational regulations. Transcriptomic profiling can be performed to explore the changes in gene transcription and transcript isoform compositions under different thermal conditions. Proteomic approaches can be utilized to characterize the regulation of proteins and post-translational modifications upon temperature stresses, especially the modifications intimately associated with signal transduction. Comparative genomic analysis can be conducted to uncover the effects of genetic diversity on the response and resistance to temperature stresses. Epigenetics methods are encouraged to reveal functions of DNA and histone modifications in the control of signaling pathways associated with temperature stresses. Functions of key regulators during these processes can be characterized in cell lines and experimental animals by generating knockout models using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. From a systems biology perspective, gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction networks based on the results of “-omics” and gene function studies can be generated to deepen the understanding of the genetic basis for temperature stress response and acclimation.

This Research Topic welcomes, but is not limited to, the following subtopics:
• Genetic basis that determines the resistance and acclimation to temperature stresses in animal models.
• The contribution of genetic diversity in populations to temperature responses.
• The key factors that regulate the gene expression programs elicited by temperature stresses and the corresponding molecular mechanisms.
• Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA and histone modifications that regulate the response and resistance to temperature stresses.
• Effects of RNA splicing, RNA editing, and RNA secondary structures that are favored upon changed temperature.
• Proteomics (e.g., quantitative and phosphorus proteomics) to investigate the regulation events upon temperature stress at the peptide level.
• Comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics to understand temperature stress responses in different animal species or different strains of the same species.


Keywords: temperature stress, stress response, gene expression regulation, signal transduction, signalling networks


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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