Research Topic

Multifunctional Metal-Organic Framework Composites: Fabrication and Application in Catalysis

About this Research Topic

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as porous coordination polymers (PCPs), are a class of porous crystalline materials where their structure is defined by organic linkers and metal ions or clusters. Because of their exceptional internal surface area, tunable pore size and tailored structure, MOFs have been widely used in gas storage, drug delivery, adsorption of hazardous materials, and catalysis. For catalytic applications, MOFs have been widely exploited for selective catalysis because the pore size and shape of MOFs can easily be controlled for adsorption of targeted molecules. However, MOFs exhibit a few weak points including poor chemical stability that can hamper their use. In this regard, encapsulation of functional materials within MOFs is an ideal approach to combine the merits and mitigate the shortcomings of both components.

Combining porous MOFs with a variety of nanoparticles leads to the formation of novel multifunctional composites, which display high performance that are superior to those of the individual components. This Research Topic aims to provide comprehensive information on novel MOFs-based porous nanocomposites, and the design, development and use of nanocomposites and nanotechnologies for catalytic-related applications. The catalytic activity of MOFs composites is usually affected by various factors, especially the interactions between the nanoparticles and the MOFs supports. This Research Topic will encourage chemists to understand the reasons for the superior catalytic activity of MOF-based nanocomposite catalysts and investigation of high-performance catalysts.

This Research Topic welcomes Original Research and Review papers that cover all aspects of the production of MOFs-based nanocomposites, and properties or applications of MOFs-based nanocomposites related to catalysis. Submissions should focus on the chemistry in a materials context and can be theoretical and/or experimental in nature.

Potential subjects include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Multifunctional nanoporous materials
• Novel fabrication of MOFs-based nanocomposites
• Advanced characterizations for MOFs-based nanocomposites
• MOFs-based nanocomposites for heterogeneous catalysis
• MOFs-based nanocomposites for photocatalysis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as porous coordination polymers (PCPs), are a class of porous crystalline materials where their structure is defined by organic linkers and metal ions or clusters. Because of their exceptional internal surface area, tunable pore size and tailored structure, MOFs have been widely used in gas storage, drug delivery, adsorption of hazardous materials, and catalysis. For catalytic applications, MOFs have been widely exploited for selective catalysis because the pore size and shape of MOFs can easily be controlled for adsorption of targeted molecules. However, MOFs exhibit a few weak points including poor chemical stability that can hamper their use. In this regard, encapsulation of functional materials within MOFs is an ideal approach to combine the merits and mitigate the shortcomings of both components.

Combining porous MOFs with a variety of nanoparticles leads to the formation of novel multifunctional composites, which display high performance that are superior to those of the individual components. This Research Topic aims to provide comprehensive information on novel MOFs-based porous nanocomposites, and the design, development and use of nanocomposites and nanotechnologies for catalytic-related applications. The catalytic activity of MOFs composites is usually affected by various factors, especially the interactions between the nanoparticles and the MOFs supports. This Research Topic will encourage chemists to understand the reasons for the superior catalytic activity of MOF-based nanocomposite catalysts and investigation of high-performance catalysts.

This Research Topic welcomes Original Research and Review papers that cover all aspects of the production of MOFs-based nanocomposites, and properties or applications of MOFs-based nanocomposites related to catalysis. Submissions should focus on the chemistry in a materials context and can be theoretical and/or experimental in nature.

Potential subjects include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Multifunctional nanoporous materials
• Novel fabrication of MOFs-based nanocomposites
• Advanced characterizations for MOFs-based nanocomposites
• MOFs-based nanocomposites for heterogeneous catalysis
• MOFs-based nanocomposites for photocatalysis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

20 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

20 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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