Research Topic

Green Synthesis and Applications of Functional Nanomaterials

About this Research Topic

Nanomaterials are seen as a promising candidate to trigger a revolution in future electronic and energy storage devices. The present technologies for electronic and energy storage nanomaterials, which are predominantly based on inorganic materials, have proven to be unsustainable, since they generate colossal amounts of waste (for example, electrical and electronic equipment) and cause rapid depletion of natural elements. In contrast, both 'green' and 'bio-derived' materials and synthesis technologies are potential avenues towards the ambitious target of sustainability in the electronic and energy storage field. Over the past several decades, significant progress has been made in developing alternative green technologies to synthesize nanomaterials with distinct morphologies and microstructures for multifunctional applications.

Presently, batteries are one of the main sources of waste, therefore, new chemistry and technologies covering the entire supply chain for developing environmentally-friendly batteries are in high demand. In addition, the extensive utilization of electronic and energy storage devices across industry and daily life places people are at risk of severe threats resulting from increasing electromagnetic radiation or pollution. However, current nanomaterial synthesis protocols usually suffer from complicated procedures, environmental risks, and poor product quality, which all limit their wider practical implementation.

In this Research Topic, we aim to solicit papers on future research directions in functional nanomaterials based on green materials, bio-derived materials and green synthesis strategies. Subjects of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Straightforward and environmentally-friendly techniques for synthesis of high-quality nanomaterials.
• Sustainable processes for electrode, electrolyte and membrane production for green batteries and supercapacitors.
• Novel hydrogen storage nanomaterials.
• Advanced characterization and simulation for greener preparation processes of functional nanomaterials.
• Synthesis of porous materials for electromagnetic wave absorption, energy storage and conversion, green catalysis, gas storage and separation.
• Chemistry of reuse and recycling of multifunctional nanomaterials.
• Theoretical investigations of green synthesis and applications of nanomaterials.


Keywords: Green Chemistry


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Nanomaterials are seen as a promising candidate to trigger a revolution in future electronic and energy storage devices. The present technologies for electronic and energy storage nanomaterials, which are predominantly based on inorganic materials, have proven to be unsustainable, since they generate colossal amounts of waste (for example, electrical and electronic equipment) and cause rapid depletion of natural elements. In contrast, both 'green' and 'bio-derived' materials and synthesis technologies are potential avenues towards the ambitious target of sustainability in the electronic and energy storage field. Over the past several decades, significant progress has been made in developing alternative green technologies to synthesize nanomaterials with distinct morphologies and microstructures for multifunctional applications.

Presently, batteries are one of the main sources of waste, therefore, new chemistry and technologies covering the entire supply chain for developing environmentally-friendly batteries are in high demand. In addition, the extensive utilization of electronic and energy storage devices across industry and daily life places people are at risk of severe threats resulting from increasing electromagnetic radiation or pollution. However, current nanomaterial synthesis protocols usually suffer from complicated procedures, environmental risks, and poor product quality, which all limit their wider practical implementation.

In this Research Topic, we aim to solicit papers on future research directions in functional nanomaterials based on green materials, bio-derived materials and green synthesis strategies. Subjects of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Straightforward and environmentally-friendly techniques for synthesis of high-quality nanomaterials.
• Sustainable processes for electrode, electrolyte and membrane production for green batteries and supercapacitors.
• Novel hydrogen storage nanomaterials.
• Advanced characterization and simulation for greener preparation processes of functional nanomaterials.
• Synthesis of porous materials for electromagnetic wave absorption, energy storage and conversion, green catalysis, gas storage and separation.
• Chemistry of reuse and recycling of multifunctional nanomaterials.
• Theoretical investigations of green synthesis and applications of nanomaterials.


Keywords: Green Chemistry


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 July 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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