Research Topic

Structural Characterization and Analysis of Intercalation and Insertion Compounds

About this Research Topic

In the field of solid-state chemistry, the class of materials represented by intercalation and insertion compounds (IIC) deserves particular interest for a variety of reasons. These range from the versatility of the synthetic procedures for producing IICs, to the plethora of applications in which IICs can be adopted as active functional materials. Indeed, IICs are practically unique in modulating reversibly (or quasi reversibly) their chemical-physical properties in a wide range of values through reactions that do not require extreme conditions of realization in terms of pressure, temperature and chemical ambient.

The continuous development of IICs for diverse advanced technologies requires an adequate portfolio of investigation techniques for a meaningful characterization of IICs, with a special emphasis to the determination of their crystal structure and the definition of their chemical composition. Indeed, IICs undergo severe structural and compositional changes due to the reaction of insertion/intercalation during operation.

The aim of this Research Topic is to achieve a full comprehension of intercalation/insertion phenomena in the IICs of practical interest. Indeed, such understanding is crucial for the diagnosis and optimization of intercalation/insertion materials in the specific areas of their applications. At this regard the structural characterizations of IICs by means of in-situ/in-operando techniques represent a very important aspect to cover.

The contributors to this Research Topic are invited to submit either Original Research or Review articles on the following themes:
• structural characterization of IICs employed as active materials in advanced technologies and devices of interest in electrochemistry, catalysis, magnetism, optics, biology and medicine among others
• preparation of new and innovative IICs
• analysis of the reactivity of IICs
• modelling of IICs and evaluation of their stability
• study of the different types of transitions occurring in IICs
• description of alternative techniques for the non-invasive and non-destructive analysis of IICs
• determination of electronic, optical and conduction properties of IICs.


Keywords: inorganic chemistry, graphite, solid state chemistry and physics, electrochemistry, intercalation compounds


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the field of solid-state chemistry, the class of materials represented by intercalation and insertion compounds (IIC) deserves particular interest for a variety of reasons. These range from the versatility of the synthetic procedures for producing IICs, to the plethora of applications in which IICs can be adopted as active functional materials. Indeed, IICs are practically unique in modulating reversibly (or quasi reversibly) their chemical-physical properties in a wide range of values through reactions that do not require extreme conditions of realization in terms of pressure, temperature and chemical ambient.

The continuous development of IICs for diverse advanced technologies requires an adequate portfolio of investigation techniques for a meaningful characterization of IICs, with a special emphasis to the determination of their crystal structure and the definition of their chemical composition. Indeed, IICs undergo severe structural and compositional changes due to the reaction of insertion/intercalation during operation.

The aim of this Research Topic is to achieve a full comprehension of intercalation/insertion phenomena in the IICs of practical interest. Indeed, such understanding is crucial for the diagnosis and optimization of intercalation/insertion materials in the specific areas of their applications. At this regard the structural characterizations of IICs by means of in-situ/in-operando techniques represent a very important aspect to cover.

The contributors to this Research Topic are invited to submit either Original Research or Review articles on the following themes:
• structural characterization of IICs employed as active materials in advanced technologies and devices of interest in electrochemistry, catalysis, magnetism, optics, biology and medicine among others
• preparation of new and innovative IICs
• analysis of the reactivity of IICs
• modelling of IICs and evaluation of their stability
• study of the different types of transitions occurring in IICs
• description of alternative techniques for the non-invasive and non-destructive analysis of IICs
• determination of electronic, optical and conduction properties of IICs.


Keywords: inorganic chemistry, graphite, solid state chemistry and physics, electrochemistry, intercalation compounds


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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