Research Topic

Neuroscience of Emotion Regulation: From Intrapersonal to Interpersonal

About this Research Topic

Emotion dysregulation represents a core component of mental disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder, MDD). However, most research on emotion regulation has overemphasized intrapersonal emotion regulation, e.g., individual cognitive reappraisal, but ignores interpersonal emotion dynamics: most of our emotions are shaped by close personal relationships, and reciprocally. This is inconsistent with the increasingly accepted view that interpersonal emotion regulations are indispensable components of understanding relational contexts related to mental disorders.

Over the past decade or so, the multimodal neuroimaging techniques such as electrophysiology (EEG), functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), play a key role in revealing the neural mechanism of intrapersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders. Recently, the multiple-brain paradigm has become more and more popular in understanding interpersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders. Undoubtedly, the multimodal neuroimaging not only provides new opportunities in how neuroscientific technologies can advance our understanding of brain differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders but also facilitate the development of new and improved treatment strategies.

The aim of this Research Topic is to integrate neuropsychology, psychiatry, and neurocomputational model to further explore the neurocognitive mechanism of both intrapersonal and interpersonal emotional regulation in mental disorders. We welcome Review articles and Original research that ranges from behavioral to clinical neuroimaging to explore emotion regulation in a close relationship in mental disorders, particularly MDD. Moreover, we welcome dyadic interaction data and solicit the dynamical model of emotion regulation in the field of mental disorders.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• Early recognition of emotional dysregulation in mental disorders.
• Emotion regulation for the intervention of mental disorders (e.g., MDD).
• Emotion regulation in close relationships.
• Multimodal neuroimaging combined with tDCS.


Keywords: mental disorders, mutlimodal neuroimaging, neurostimultion, neurocomputation, emotion regulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Emotion dysregulation represents a core component of mental disorders (e.g., major depressive disorder, MDD). However, most research on emotion regulation has overemphasized intrapersonal emotion regulation, e.g., individual cognitive reappraisal, but ignores interpersonal emotion dynamics: most of our emotions are shaped by close personal relationships, and reciprocally. This is inconsistent with the increasingly accepted view that interpersonal emotion regulations are indispensable components of understanding relational contexts related to mental disorders.

Over the past decade or so, the multimodal neuroimaging techniques such as electrophysiology (EEG), functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), play a key role in revealing the neural mechanism of intrapersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders. Recently, the multiple-brain paradigm has become more and more popular in understanding interpersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders. Undoubtedly, the multimodal neuroimaging not only provides new opportunities in how neuroscientific technologies can advance our understanding of brain differences between intrapersonal and interpersonal emotion regulation in mental disorders but also facilitate the development of new and improved treatment strategies.

The aim of this Research Topic is to integrate neuropsychology, psychiatry, and neurocomputational model to further explore the neurocognitive mechanism of both intrapersonal and interpersonal emotional regulation in mental disorders. We welcome Review articles and Original research that ranges from behavioral to clinical neuroimaging to explore emotion regulation in a close relationship in mental disorders, particularly MDD. Moreover, we welcome dyadic interaction data and solicit the dynamical model of emotion regulation in the field of mental disorders.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:
• Early recognition of emotional dysregulation in mental disorders.
• Emotion regulation for the intervention of mental disorders (e.g., MDD).
• Emotion regulation in close relationships.
• Multimodal neuroimaging combined with tDCS.


Keywords: mental disorders, mutlimodal neuroimaging, neurostimultion, neurocomputation, emotion regulation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Abstract
31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Abstract
31 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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