Research Topic

Subjective Cognitive Decline: An 'Objective' Early Clinical Manifestation of Neurodegenerative Diseases? Neuropsychological and Neuroimaging Evidence

About this Research Topic

Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is a term referred to as individuals’ perceived decline of memory and/or other cognitive abilities compared to their previous level of efficiency, in the absence of objective deficit at standard neuropsychological assessment.

In the past decade, there has been growing research interest in this field and some evidence highlighted how older adults with SCD have an increased likelihood to have biomarker changes consistent with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as well as an increased risk for future pathological cognitive decline. In addition, SCD can affect psychological, affective and social functioning, reducing, therefore, the global quality of life.

More research effort is needed to determine how, when, and why older adults complain about perceived cognitive changes, and whether reliable and valid cognitive markers are able yet at the onset to distinguish progressors from stable SCD, as well as from clinically normal older adults without SCD. Mechanisms underlying perceived cognitive changes in elderly people are still a matter of debate. Longitudinal studies assessing the accuracy of standardized neuropsychological measures available in the clinical setting, to early detect subjects with subtle neurodegenerative changes are definitely needed.

This Research Topic aims to provide new and in-depth knowledge, clarifying the neuroanatomical substrates of SCD and exploring the relationship between subjective cognitive complaints and sub-clinical objective changes in cognitive functioning. Psychological, affective and social changes, cognitive reserve and frailty are also interesting dimensions that are worth to be investigated in SCD populations. In addition, a better clinical-neuropsychological characterization of SCD subjects at risk for dementia is desirable for diagnostic and treatment purposes.

Contributors may present their research work based on the scientific method that directly links brain functions with cognitive processes, using any available neuropsychological, neuroimaging and/or neurophysiological tools and techniques.


Keywords: subjective cognitive decline, cognitive complaints, social functioning, neurodegenerative disease, neuropsychology, neuroimaging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Subjective cognitive decline (SCD) is a term referred to as individuals’ perceived decline of memory and/or other cognitive abilities compared to their previous level of efficiency, in the absence of objective deficit at standard neuropsychological assessment.

In the past decade, there has been growing research interest in this field and some evidence highlighted how older adults with SCD have an increased likelihood to have biomarker changes consistent with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as well as an increased risk for future pathological cognitive decline. In addition, SCD can affect psychological, affective and social functioning, reducing, therefore, the global quality of life.

More research effort is needed to determine how, when, and why older adults complain about perceived cognitive changes, and whether reliable and valid cognitive markers are able yet at the onset to distinguish progressors from stable SCD, as well as from clinically normal older adults without SCD. Mechanisms underlying perceived cognitive changes in elderly people are still a matter of debate. Longitudinal studies assessing the accuracy of standardized neuropsychological measures available in the clinical setting, to early detect subjects with subtle neurodegenerative changes are definitely needed.

This Research Topic aims to provide new and in-depth knowledge, clarifying the neuroanatomical substrates of SCD and exploring the relationship between subjective cognitive complaints and sub-clinical objective changes in cognitive functioning. Psychological, affective and social changes, cognitive reserve and frailty are also interesting dimensions that are worth to be investigated in SCD populations. In addition, a better clinical-neuropsychological characterization of SCD subjects at risk for dementia is desirable for diagnostic and treatment purposes.

Contributors may present their research work based on the scientific method that directly links brain functions with cognitive processes, using any available neuropsychological, neuroimaging and/or neurophysiological tools and techniques.


Keywords: subjective cognitive decline, cognitive complaints, social functioning, neurodegenerative disease, neuropsychology, neuroimaging


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2020 Abstract
28 February 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..