Research Topic

Mitochondrial Metabolism Regulating Cardiac Homeostasis

About this Research Topic

The heart is one of the most ATP-consuming organs in humans. The daily production and consumption of ATP by adult hearts is about 6 kg, over 95% of which is generated through oxidative phosphorylation occurring in the mitochondria. Mitochondria are also important for the regulation of calcium signaling and for the production of ROS and metabolic intermediates that are often involved in the epigenetic regulation of various cellular activities. Therefore, mitochondrial fitness is critical for maintaining cardiac homeostasis and function. Mitochondrial abnormalities may lead to reduced energy production and altered electrical characteristics, thus causing fatal cardiac diseases. There is a broad scientific and clinical interest in a deeper understanding of the mitochondrial/metabolic regulation of cardiac homeostasis.

In this Research Topic, we aim to gather Original Research and Review articles focusing on new discoveries and providing a comprehensive summary of the current knowledge on the mitochondrial/metabolic regulation of cardiac homeostasis. Our aim is to deepen our understanding of the characteristics of mitochondria and metabolism in aged and diseased hearts, unravel molecular mechanisms by which mitochondria-linked metabolism regulate cardiac homeostasis, identifying new metabolic targets for cardiac diseases and small-molecule compounds that regulate mitochondria and metabolism to maintain cardiac homeostasis.

In particular, the main goals are:

• To characterize the changes in mitochondrial metabolism during cardiac aging and diseases.
• To reveal the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial metabolism regulating cardiac homeostasis.
• To identify novel mitochondrial/metabolic targets for cardiac homeostasis using multi-omics analysis including transcriptomics, metabolomics, and epigenomics.
• To screen for small-molecule compounds that regulate cardiac homeostasis by targeting mitochondrial metabolism in hiPSC-derived cardiovascular cells and animal models.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The heart is one of the most ATP-consuming organs in humans. The daily production and consumption of ATP by adult hearts is about 6 kg, over 95% of which is generated through oxidative phosphorylation occurring in the mitochondria. Mitochondria are also important for the regulation of calcium signaling and for the production of ROS and metabolic intermediates that are often involved in the epigenetic regulation of various cellular activities. Therefore, mitochondrial fitness is critical for maintaining cardiac homeostasis and function. Mitochondrial abnormalities may lead to reduced energy production and altered electrical characteristics, thus causing fatal cardiac diseases. There is a broad scientific and clinical interest in a deeper understanding of the mitochondrial/metabolic regulation of cardiac homeostasis.

In this Research Topic, we aim to gather Original Research and Review articles focusing on new discoveries and providing a comprehensive summary of the current knowledge on the mitochondrial/metabolic regulation of cardiac homeostasis. Our aim is to deepen our understanding of the characteristics of mitochondria and metabolism in aged and diseased hearts, unravel molecular mechanisms by which mitochondria-linked metabolism regulate cardiac homeostasis, identifying new metabolic targets for cardiac diseases and small-molecule compounds that regulate mitochondria and metabolism to maintain cardiac homeostasis.

In particular, the main goals are:

• To characterize the changes in mitochondrial metabolism during cardiac aging and diseases.
• To reveal the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial metabolism regulating cardiac homeostasis.
• To identify novel mitochondrial/metabolic targets for cardiac homeostasis using multi-omics analysis including transcriptomics, metabolomics, and epigenomics.
• To screen for small-molecule compounds that regulate cardiac homeostasis by targeting mitochondrial metabolism in hiPSC-derived cardiovascular cells and animal models.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
15 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Abstract
15 November 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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