Research Topic

Biomimetic Electronic Sensors: Emulation of Sophisticated and Evolved Natural Sensorial Systems

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About this Research Topic

Every day we are surrounded by new sources of inspiration for improving our designs. Biodiversity allows for the observation of refined strategies to communicate and survive in the environment. In this context, sense organs, motion and mimetic systems, as well as the neural signal coding and processing, has often inspired the continuous advancements in sensors and electronic interfaces, as well as the development of bio-inspired algorithms. Findings in these areas have fostered the continuous design of devices in the most challenging research fields. One of the most interesting applications for the emulation of the sophisticated and evolved sensorial systems present in nature is the development of electronic sensors and interfaces.

The field of biomimesis is inherently cross-disciplinary, encompassing engineering, and the health and environmental sciences. In the last decade, the development of high-performance materials and the growth of integrated technologies has allowed for the development of a long list of devices and applications which span from artificial sensory systems for rehabilitation and robotics, to brain-inspired machine interfaces. Even more sophisticated biomimetic devices request the development of new electronic materials and geometrical designs which yield to sensors and interfaces with the necessity of maintaining the levels of performance, reliability, and integration of conventional wafer-based systems. The main focus of this Research Topic is to provide a non-exhaustive track on recently developed electronic sensors and interfaces, highlighting the bio-mechanism underlying the design.

This Research Topic welcomes Original Research articles and Reviews articles. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Biomimetic electronic sensors and applications
• Sensorial network and electric feedback in rehabilitation
• Low-power electronic interfaces for biomedical signals
• Integration of biomimetic sensors and machine learning/AI

Dr. Salvatore Pullano is a co-founder of the start-up Ippocratech. Prof. Syed K. Islam, Prof. Antonino S. Fiorillo and Dr. Salvatore A. Pullano hold patents related to sensors and sensorial systems.


Keywords: Electronic Sensors, Actuators, Electronic Interfaces, Biosensors, Biomimetics, Artificial Intelligence


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Every day we are surrounded by new sources of inspiration for improving our designs. Biodiversity allows for the observation of refined strategies to communicate and survive in the environment. In this context, sense organs, motion and mimetic systems, as well as the neural signal coding and processing, has often inspired the continuous advancements in sensors and electronic interfaces, as well as the development of bio-inspired algorithms. Findings in these areas have fostered the continuous design of devices in the most challenging research fields. One of the most interesting applications for the emulation of the sophisticated and evolved sensorial systems present in nature is the development of electronic sensors and interfaces.

The field of biomimesis is inherently cross-disciplinary, encompassing engineering, and the health and environmental sciences. In the last decade, the development of high-performance materials and the growth of integrated technologies has allowed for the development of a long list of devices and applications which span from artificial sensory systems for rehabilitation and robotics, to brain-inspired machine interfaces. Even more sophisticated biomimetic devices request the development of new electronic materials and geometrical designs which yield to sensors and interfaces with the necessity of maintaining the levels of performance, reliability, and integration of conventional wafer-based systems. The main focus of this Research Topic is to provide a non-exhaustive track on recently developed electronic sensors and interfaces, highlighting the bio-mechanism underlying the design.

This Research Topic welcomes Original Research articles and Reviews articles. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

• Biomimetic electronic sensors and applications
• Sensorial network and electric feedback in rehabilitation
• Low-power electronic interfaces for biomedical signals
• Integration of biomimetic sensors and machine learning/AI

Dr. Salvatore Pullano is a co-founder of the start-up Ippocratech. Prof. Syed K. Islam, Prof. Antonino S. Fiorillo and Dr. Salvatore A. Pullano hold patents related to sensors and sensorial systems.


Keywords: Electronic Sensors, Actuators, Electronic Interfaces, Biosensors, Biomimetics, Artificial Intelligence


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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