Research Topic

Nanoplasmonic Thin Films: From Plasmon-Enhanced Light-Matter Interactions to Sensing Applications

About this Research Topic

The field of nanoplasmonics deals with the study of the electromagnetic phenomena in the nanoscale vicinity of metal surfaces. Although it may sound strange to common sense, the awareness of the resonant properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is readily apparent to the naked eye. Because the nanoparticles absorb and scatter visible light, they can generate a wide palette of colors, depending on their concentration, geometries, and dimensions. These optical effects have been used since antiquity (e.g. in Roman glasses and stained-glass windows of medieval cathedrals) and have inspired several practical uses in different scientific and technological areas. The physical interpretation of plasmonic effects only started to gain relevance at the beginning of the 20th century with the theory proposed by Gustav Mie, who deduced a solution of Maxwell's equations to calculate the extinction spectrum of a metallic nanoparticle in the quasi-static condition. Yet, only in the 1950s, it was experimentally demonstrated the existence of self-sustained collective excitations at metal surfaces, which were named thereafter as surface plasmons. About two decades later, in 1974, it was reported for the first time the phenomenon of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

In the last few decades, there have been significant advances in both theoretical and experimental investigations of surface plasmons, which led to the development of new simulation methods to calculate the optical properties of nanoplasmonic systems and has delivered a relevant number of important applications.

This Research Topic focuses on the latest advances and most exciting results in the area of Nanoplasmonic Thin Films, i.e. materials containing plasmonic nanoparticles used to enhance several light-matter interaction processes (Raman scattering, photocatalysis, chemical energy conversion, heat generation, photovoltaics, etc.), to accurately detect different kinds of molecules and biomolecules using label-free sensing platforms, or even to perform biological imaging and photothermal therapies.

We welcome contributions reporting new knowledge and/or breakthrough innovations in the development of nanoplasmonic thin films, addressing radical new design concepts that can be supported by theory, and new thin film deposition pathways to fabricate these materials, ranging from physical vapor deposition (PVD) to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques, or nanolithography methods.

Potential subjects to be explored in this Research Topic include (but are not limited to):

• Theory of Surface Plasmons;
• Modeling Nanoplasmonic Effects;
• Graphene/Plasmonic Nanoparticles Systems;
• Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)
• Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Sensors;
• Plasmon-Enhanced Photocatalysis;
• Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Coupled to Plasmonic Structures (e.g. Fano Resonances);
• Enhanced Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect using Plasmonic Materials;
• Thermal Phototherapy of Tumors Using Plasmonic Nanoparticles.


Keywords: Nanoplasmonics, Plasmon-Enhanced Phenomena, Plasmonic Sensors, Thin Films


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The field of nanoplasmonics deals with the study of the electromagnetic phenomena in the nanoscale vicinity of metal surfaces. Although it may sound strange to common sense, the awareness of the resonant properties of plasmonic metal nanoparticles is readily apparent to the naked eye. Because the nanoparticles absorb and scatter visible light, they can generate a wide palette of colors, depending on their concentration, geometries, and dimensions. These optical effects have been used since antiquity (e.g. in Roman glasses and stained-glass windows of medieval cathedrals) and have inspired several practical uses in different scientific and technological areas. The physical interpretation of plasmonic effects only started to gain relevance at the beginning of the 20th century with the theory proposed by Gustav Mie, who deduced a solution of Maxwell's equations to calculate the extinction spectrum of a metallic nanoparticle in the quasi-static condition. Yet, only in the 1950s, it was experimentally demonstrated the existence of self-sustained collective excitations at metal surfaces, which were named thereafter as surface plasmons. About two decades later, in 1974, it was reported for the first time the phenomenon of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

In the last few decades, there have been significant advances in both theoretical and experimental investigations of surface plasmons, which led to the development of new simulation methods to calculate the optical properties of nanoplasmonic systems and has delivered a relevant number of important applications.

This Research Topic focuses on the latest advances and most exciting results in the area of Nanoplasmonic Thin Films, i.e. materials containing plasmonic nanoparticles used to enhance several light-matter interaction processes (Raman scattering, photocatalysis, chemical energy conversion, heat generation, photovoltaics, etc.), to accurately detect different kinds of molecules and biomolecules using label-free sensing platforms, or even to perform biological imaging and photothermal therapies.

We welcome contributions reporting new knowledge and/or breakthrough innovations in the development of nanoplasmonic thin films, addressing radical new design concepts that can be supported by theory, and new thin film deposition pathways to fabricate these materials, ranging from physical vapor deposition (PVD) to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques, or nanolithography methods.

Potential subjects to be explored in this Research Topic include (but are not limited to):

• Theory of Surface Plasmons;
• Modeling Nanoplasmonic Effects;
• Graphene/Plasmonic Nanoparticles Systems;
• Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)
• Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) Sensors;
• Plasmon-Enhanced Photocatalysis;
• Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Coupled to Plasmonic Structures (e.g. Fano Resonances);
• Enhanced Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect using Plasmonic Materials;
• Thermal Phototherapy of Tumors Using Plasmonic Nanoparticles.


Keywords: Nanoplasmonics, Plasmon-Enhanced Phenomena, Plasmonic Sensors, Thin Films


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

07 August 2020 Abstract
08 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

07 August 2020 Abstract
08 December 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..