Research Topic

Cyclodextrin Chemistry: Synthetic Strategies and Biomedical Applications

About this Research Topic

Cyclodextrins (CDs) are iconic cage molecules that have played a central role in the development of supramolecular chemistry. Their characteristic inside/outside amphiphilic nature enables the formation of inclusion complexes with guest molecules fitting their inner cavity, a property largely exploited for the encapsulation of pharmaceuticals, volatiles or contaminants. CDs further exhibit an intrinsic Janus architecture, with two well differentiated rims that orient the primary (OH-6) and secondary hydroxyls (OH-2 and OH-3) in opposite directions. Face, single point and multipoint selective functionalization can be achieved through precision chemistry strategies, allowing the installation of a large variety of functional elements with surgical accuracy for, e.g., self-assembling, biomolecular recognition, polymerization, targeting, stimuli responsiveness or sensing. Alternatively, conjugation of appropriately functionalized CDs with other macromolecular, biomolecular, polymeric or nanoparticulate systems allow access to hybrid materials with tailored supramolecular properties, with applications spanning from theranostics and controlled drug release to diagnostics or tissue engineering.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover the latest advances in the field of cyclodextrins with a focus in the potential of selective chemical functionalization strategies to modify the properties of the native representatives and access original CD-containing devices and materials for applications in the biomedical field.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• New methodologies for the selective chemical functionalization of cyclodextrins.
• Development of cyclodextrin derivatives with improved solubility/drug inclusion capabilities.
• Cyclodextrin conjugates and their interactions with biomolecules.
• Cyclodextrin-based drug and/or gene delivery systems.
• Hybrid materials and nanomaterials containing cyclodextrins for biomedical applications.
• De novo synthesis of cyclodextrin-like cyclooligosaccharides.


Keywords: Synthesis, Selective Modifications, Inclusion Complex, Sensor, Metal Complexation, Cyclodextrin-based new materials, cyclodextrins, cyclooligosaccharides, drug delivery, gene delivery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cyclodextrins (CDs) are iconic cage molecules that have played a central role in the development of supramolecular chemistry. Their characteristic inside/outside amphiphilic nature enables the formation of inclusion complexes with guest molecules fitting their inner cavity, a property largely exploited for the encapsulation of pharmaceuticals, volatiles or contaminants. CDs further exhibit an intrinsic Janus architecture, with two well differentiated rims that orient the primary (OH-6) and secondary hydroxyls (OH-2 and OH-3) in opposite directions. Face, single point and multipoint selective functionalization can be achieved through precision chemistry strategies, allowing the installation of a large variety of functional elements with surgical accuracy for, e.g., self-assembling, biomolecular recognition, polymerization, targeting, stimuli responsiveness or sensing. Alternatively, conjugation of appropriately functionalized CDs with other macromolecular, biomolecular, polymeric or nanoparticulate systems allow access to hybrid materials with tailored supramolecular properties, with applications spanning from theranostics and controlled drug release to diagnostics or tissue engineering.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover the latest advances in the field of cyclodextrins with a focus in the potential of selective chemical functionalization strategies to modify the properties of the native representatives and access original CD-containing devices and materials for applications in the biomedical field.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• New methodologies for the selective chemical functionalization of cyclodextrins.
• Development of cyclodextrin derivatives with improved solubility/drug inclusion capabilities.
• Cyclodextrin conjugates and their interactions with biomolecules.
• Cyclodextrin-based drug and/or gene delivery systems.
• Hybrid materials and nanomaterials containing cyclodextrins for biomedical applications.
• De novo synthesis of cyclodextrin-like cyclooligosaccharides.


Keywords: Synthesis, Selective Modifications, Inclusion Complex, Sensor, Metal Complexation, Cyclodextrin-based new materials, cyclodextrins, cyclooligosaccharides, drug delivery, gene delivery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

25 June 2020 Abstract
21 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

25 June 2020 Abstract
21 September 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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