Research Topic

Novel Therapeutics and Vaccines to Fight the Rise in Antimicrobial Resistance

About this Research Topic

The ability of microbial pathogens to resist antibiotic treatment is among the top public health threats of the 21st century. Infections attributed to antimicrobial-resistant organisms continue to increase in frequency and cause tremendous morbidity and mortality. Recent studies estimate that more than 2 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant organisms each year, causing the deaths of 23,000 people in the US and 33,000 people in Europe every year. Moreover, a 2014 review on antimicrobial resistance commissioned by the UK prime minister predicts significant human and economic cost over the next 35 years with 10 million deaths worldwide annually and a cost reaching 100 trillion USD. The urgency of the current situation for both the global public health and economy has further been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO), the US congress, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The rise in antimicrobial resistance is among the most challenging problems the world currently faces. Yet, major pharmaceutical companies are de-emphasizing research and development, leaving it to the academic sector to improve diagnostics, identify and test novel antibiotics, and develop alternative approaches, such as vaccines and phage therapies, to counteract this threatening development. With this in mind, the aim of this Research Topic is to provide a platform to showcase recent and novel research findings in the area of controlling and preventing antimicrobial resistance. We specifically welcome contributions that focus on new, unconventional technologies that address the problem in the form of original research and review articles.

We welcome submissions which cover the following areas:

• Discovery and validation of new antibiotics and other antimicrobials, including anti-adaptation antibiotics
• Monoclonal antibodies as an alternative form of treatment
• Development and delivery of antimicrobial vaccines
• Novel targets for antimicrobial design
• "Omic" analysis to personalize antimicrobial therapy



Dr. Davlieva is employed by Quantapore Inc. The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regards to the Research Topic theme.


Keywords: drug resistance, antibiotics, pathogens, drug design, infectious diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The ability of microbial pathogens to resist antibiotic treatment is among the top public health threats of the 21st century. Infections attributed to antimicrobial-resistant organisms continue to increase in frequency and cause tremendous morbidity and mortality. Recent studies estimate that more than 2 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant organisms each year, causing the deaths of 23,000 people in the US and 33,000 people in Europe every year. Moreover, a 2014 review on antimicrobial resistance commissioned by the UK prime minister predicts significant human and economic cost over the next 35 years with 10 million deaths worldwide annually and a cost reaching 100 trillion USD. The urgency of the current situation for both the global public health and economy has further been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO), the US congress, and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The rise in antimicrobial resistance is among the most challenging problems the world currently faces. Yet, major pharmaceutical companies are de-emphasizing research and development, leaving it to the academic sector to improve diagnostics, identify and test novel antibiotics, and develop alternative approaches, such as vaccines and phage therapies, to counteract this threatening development. With this in mind, the aim of this Research Topic is to provide a platform to showcase recent and novel research findings in the area of controlling and preventing antimicrobial resistance. We specifically welcome contributions that focus on new, unconventional technologies that address the problem in the form of original research and review articles.

We welcome submissions which cover the following areas:

• Discovery and validation of new antibiotics and other antimicrobials, including anti-adaptation antibiotics
• Monoclonal antibodies as an alternative form of treatment
• Development and delivery of antimicrobial vaccines
• Novel targets for antimicrobial design
• "Omic" analysis to personalize antimicrobial therapy



Dr. Davlieva is employed by Quantapore Inc. The other Topic Editors declare no competing interests with regards to the Research Topic theme.


Keywords: drug resistance, antibiotics, pathogens, drug design, infectious diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

27 July 2020 Abstract
27 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

27 July 2020 Abstract
27 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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