Research Topic

Transition of Care in Surgical Diabetic Patients

About this Research Topic

According to the American Diabetes Association,1.25 million Americans have type 1 insulin dependent diabetes. This disease is found in all races and ages and it is projected that there will be 40000 more people diagnosed this year. The second, and more common type of diabetes is insulin resistant type 2. It is expected that 1.5 million people will be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes this year. Many of these patients will find themselves in need of surgery or other procedures which require anesthesia. There is currently no standard of care to follow these patients throughout their preoperative and anesthesia journey. Each segment of the journey may have its own standards and metrics, such as following blood glucose levels and adjusting medication. But it is not guaranteed that each segment, such as the preoperative clinic, the surgery suite, the post-operative area and the post discharge area, will collaborate. We believe this is an important area of research and wish to publish articles relating to the transition of care in Diabetes.

Transition of care for patients is an important topic which is increasingly gaining attention. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) declares this as the movement of a patient from one setting to another. The settings this may occur in are varied: ambulatory centers, nursing homes and hospitals are just a few. The danger for patients is that transitions and changing of care providers increase the possibility of errors, miscommunication and adverse events. There must be an in-depth and acute awareness of the potential dangers and safety concerns by both the discharging care team and the accepting care team. We intend to explore this complex and important issue, and are interested in trends in transition care, modes and methods of this care, best practices and groups with care disparities. We believe this is a relevant topic and wish to publish research exploring this issue.


Keywords: Transition of Care, Diabetes, Surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

According to the American Diabetes Association,1.25 million Americans have type 1 insulin dependent diabetes. This disease is found in all races and ages and it is projected that there will be 40000 more people diagnosed this year. The second, and more common type of diabetes is insulin resistant type 2. It is expected that 1.5 million people will be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes this year. Many of these patients will find themselves in need of surgery or other procedures which require anesthesia. There is currently no standard of care to follow these patients throughout their preoperative and anesthesia journey. Each segment of the journey may have its own standards and metrics, such as following blood glucose levels and adjusting medication. But it is not guaranteed that each segment, such as the preoperative clinic, the surgery suite, the post-operative area and the post discharge area, will collaborate. We believe this is an important area of research and wish to publish articles relating to the transition of care in Diabetes.

Transition of care for patients is an important topic which is increasingly gaining attention. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) declares this as the movement of a patient from one setting to another. The settings this may occur in are varied: ambulatory centers, nursing homes and hospitals are just a few. The danger for patients is that transitions and changing of care providers increase the possibility of errors, miscommunication and adverse events. There must be an in-depth and acute awareness of the potential dangers and safety concerns by both the discharging care team and the accepting care team. We intend to explore this complex and important issue, and are interested in trends in transition care, modes and methods of this care, best practices and groups with care disparities. We believe this is a relevant topic and wish to publish research exploring this issue.


Keywords: Transition of Care, Diabetes, Surgery


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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