Research Topic

Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Metal Alloys Obtained by Additive Manufacturing Techniques

About this Research Topic

Nowadays there is a strong interest in manufacturing technologies that produce metal components close to the final size and shape, requiring a minimum amount of finishing process. In comparison with traditional processes, additive manufacturing processes have significant benefits, such as near-net-shape capabilities, superior design, and geometrical flexibility, reduced tooling and fixturing, shorter cycle time for design and manufacturing, and material, energy, and cost-efficiency.

In addition, metal matrix composite and new alloys can be produced by the simultaneous printing of different powders, with countless possibilities to develop new materials. Moreover, these new techniques can produce non-equilibrium microstructures with different behavior with respect to traditional materials. Several researchers in the field of additive manufacturing have tried to overcome all the issues connected with the production process to develop dense, defect-free and reliable materials. However, the use of additively manufactured components in many critical fields, (i.e. biomedical, aeronautics, oil and gas industry, nuclear) requires the full qualification under conditions they operate. Specifically, it is important to account for possible synergic interactions between mechanical stress and the environment.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in the correlation between the microstructure of metal alloys processed by means of additive manufacturing techniques, and their corrosion behavior. The papers published in this Research Topic could contribute to the complex process of standardization of these materials for critical purposes, such as the oil and gas industry or biomedical applications. Papers on metals and metal matrix composite materials that present a relationship between microstructure and properties are welcome.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Corrosion behavior and corrosion protection of alloys and metal matrix composites obtained by means of new additively manufacturing techniques;
• Environmental assisted cracking
• Biocompatibility
• Standardization


Keywords: Additive manufacturing, Corrosion, Metal alloys, Cracking, Microstructure


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Nowadays there is a strong interest in manufacturing technologies that produce metal components close to the final size and shape, requiring a minimum amount of finishing process. In comparison with traditional processes, additive manufacturing processes have significant benefits, such as near-net-shape capabilities, superior design, and geometrical flexibility, reduced tooling and fixturing, shorter cycle time for design and manufacturing, and material, energy, and cost-efficiency.

In addition, metal matrix composite and new alloys can be produced by the simultaneous printing of different powders, with countless possibilities to develop new materials. Moreover, these new techniques can produce non-equilibrium microstructures with different behavior with respect to traditional materials. Several researchers in the field of additive manufacturing have tried to overcome all the issues connected with the production process to develop dense, defect-free and reliable materials. However, the use of additively manufactured components in many critical fields, (i.e. biomedical, aeronautics, oil and gas industry, nuclear) requires the full qualification under conditions they operate. Specifically, it is important to account for possible synergic interactions between mechanical stress and the environment.

The aim of the current Research Topic is to cover promising, recent, and novel research trends in the correlation between the microstructure of metal alloys processed by means of additive manufacturing techniques, and their corrosion behavior. The papers published in this Research Topic could contribute to the complex process of standardization of these materials for critical purposes, such as the oil and gas industry or biomedical applications. Papers on metals and metal matrix composite materials that present a relationship between microstructure and properties are welcome.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Corrosion behavior and corrosion protection of alloys and metal matrix composites obtained by means of new additively manufacturing techniques;
• Environmental assisted cracking
• Biocompatibility
• Standardization


Keywords: Additive manufacturing, Corrosion, Metal alloys, Cracking, Microstructure


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
13 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

15 June 2020 Abstract
13 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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