Research Topic

Fertility in Klinefelter Syndrome: The Need for a Multidisciplinary Approach

About this Research Topic

Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is defined by the karyotype 47 XXY and is the most common chromosomal male anomaly associated with infertility; it typically affects 1 in 600 males. Due to the large variability of clinical signs and symptoms, many individuals with KS can go on without being diagnosed. Thus, many patients with KS may only get diagnosed with the condition when going through an investigation for infertility. Although discovered more than 70 years ago, there is currently still great difficulty in the management of the condition. Besides infertility, patients with KS face a wide range of challenges affecting their physical and mental health, most of which centers around hypogonadism, encompassing areas from seven different specialties (Urology, Endocrine, Radiology, Fertility, Embryology, and Psychosexual), with the majority of diagnoses in adults emerging from fertility investigations.

This Research Topic will provide a platform for challenges and breakthroughs in each specialty that has led to a greater understanding of KS and emphasizing the need for a team approach to managing the condition. The following contributions are welcomed, but not limited to:

a) Perspectives - on Klinefelter Syndrome & the need for a multidisciplinary approach.
b) Mini-reviews - highlighting how successful the surgical sperm retrieval in Klinefelter Syndrome is. Endocrine aspects of men with Klinefelter Syndrome: before and after fertility management. What are the spontaneous and assisted pregnancy and live birth outcomes in couples having a partner with Klinefelter Syndrome? Psychosexual issues affecting men with Klinefelter Syndrome seeking fertility management. The evidence for fertility preservation in pediatric Klinefelter Syndrome.
c) Original Research - on hormone manipulation before sperm retrieval in Klinefelter syndrome.
d) Commentaries - related to the indeterminate lesions of the testis in Klinefelter syndrome. Should we be concerned?


Keywords: Male Fertility, Klinefelter Syndrome, Multidisciplinary Clinic, Sperm Retrieval, ICSI


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is defined by the karyotype 47 XXY and is the most common chromosomal male anomaly associated with infertility; it typically affects 1 in 600 males. Due to the large variability of clinical signs and symptoms, many individuals with KS can go on without being diagnosed. Thus, many patients with KS may only get diagnosed with the condition when going through an investigation for infertility. Although discovered more than 70 years ago, there is currently still great difficulty in the management of the condition. Besides infertility, patients with KS face a wide range of challenges affecting their physical and mental health, most of which centers around hypogonadism, encompassing areas from seven different specialties (Urology, Endocrine, Radiology, Fertility, Embryology, and Psychosexual), with the majority of diagnoses in adults emerging from fertility investigations.

This Research Topic will provide a platform for challenges and breakthroughs in each specialty that has led to a greater understanding of KS and emphasizing the need for a team approach to managing the condition. The following contributions are welcomed, but not limited to:

a) Perspectives - on Klinefelter Syndrome & the need for a multidisciplinary approach.
b) Mini-reviews - highlighting how successful the surgical sperm retrieval in Klinefelter Syndrome is. Endocrine aspects of men with Klinefelter Syndrome: before and after fertility management. What are the spontaneous and assisted pregnancy and live birth outcomes in couples having a partner with Klinefelter Syndrome? Psychosexual issues affecting men with Klinefelter Syndrome seeking fertility management. The evidence for fertility preservation in pediatric Klinefelter Syndrome.
c) Original Research - on hormone manipulation before sperm retrieval in Klinefelter syndrome.
d) Commentaries - related to the indeterminate lesions of the testis in Klinefelter syndrome. Should we be concerned?


Keywords: Male Fertility, Klinefelter Syndrome, Multidisciplinary Clinic, Sperm Retrieval, ICSI


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 June 2020 Abstract
14 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 June 2020 Abstract
14 October 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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