Research Topic

Oral Microbes in Oral Mucosal Diseases, Systemic Diseases and Cancer

About this Research Topic

The importance of the human microbiome, including the oral microbiome, in health and disease, has been demonstrated. More precisely, dental caries and periodontal diseases are amongst the best-characterized diseases caused by dysbiosis of the oral microbiome. However, the potential involvement of oral microorganisms in diseases is expanding beyond dental caries and periodontal diseases.

Epidemiologic associations between periodontitis and diverse systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, has long been recognized. Besides, dysbiosis of the oral microbiota in diverse oral mucosal diseases (e.g. recurrent aphthous stomatitis, oral lichen planus, chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel diseases, Sjogren syndrome), and cancers (e.g. head and neck, colorectal) have been documented during the last decade. Evidence of how Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentially contribute to the development of colorectal cancer and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, is also available. However, the role of specific oral microorganisms in the pathogenesis of other diseases awaits to be clarified.

The objective of this Research Topic is to emphasize research on how oral microbes (bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoans) drive and contribute to diverse diseases including oral mucosal diseases, systemic diseases, cancers, and autoimmunity. Original Research Articles, Reviews, and Opinions, Hypotheses and Theories, as well as Perspectives covering the following themes (but not limited to), are welcome:

- Relationship between microbiome/mycobiome/virome and the above-mentioned conditions
- Association or role of a specific bacteria/fungus/viruses with the above-mentioned condition
- Mechanistic studies addressing the role played by oral microbes in determining the onset and development of the above-mentioned conditions
- Therapeutical strategies (using pre-/probiotics) aiming at modulating the microbiome and the clinical course of the above-mentioned conditions


Keywords: Bacteria, Fungi, Viruses, Oral Mucosal Diseases, Systemic Diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The importance of the human microbiome, including the oral microbiome, in health and disease, has been demonstrated. More precisely, dental caries and periodontal diseases are amongst the best-characterized diseases caused by dysbiosis of the oral microbiome. However, the potential involvement of oral microorganisms in diseases is expanding beyond dental caries and periodontal diseases.

Epidemiologic associations between periodontitis and diverse systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and Alzheimer's disease, has long been recognized. Besides, dysbiosis of the oral microbiota in diverse oral mucosal diseases (e.g. recurrent aphthous stomatitis, oral lichen planus, chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel diseases, Sjogren syndrome), and cancers (e.g. head and neck, colorectal) have been documented during the last decade. Evidence of how Fusobacterium nucleatum and Porphyromonas gingivalis can potentially contribute to the development of colorectal cancer and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, is also available. However, the role of specific oral microorganisms in the pathogenesis of other diseases awaits to be clarified.

The objective of this Research Topic is to emphasize research on how oral microbes (bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoans) drive and contribute to diverse diseases including oral mucosal diseases, systemic diseases, cancers, and autoimmunity. Original Research Articles, Reviews, and Opinions, Hypotheses and Theories, as well as Perspectives covering the following themes (but not limited to), are welcome:

- Relationship between microbiome/mycobiome/virome and the above-mentioned conditions
- Association or role of a specific bacteria/fungus/viruses with the above-mentioned condition
- Mechanistic studies addressing the role played by oral microbes in determining the onset and development of the above-mentioned conditions
- Therapeutical strategies (using pre-/probiotics) aiming at modulating the microbiome and the clinical course of the above-mentioned conditions


Keywords: Bacteria, Fungi, Viruses, Oral Mucosal Diseases, Systemic Diseases


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

29 January 2021 Manuscript
31 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

29 January 2021 Manuscript
31 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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