Research Topic

Blindness, Light, and the COVID-19 Pandemic

About this Research Topic

Nobel Laureate Jose Saramago published “Blindness” (Ensaio sobre a cegueira in Portuguese) in 1995, a novel that describes the effects of a mass epidemic of blindness. Unlike Saramago’s assay, in which the cause of the epidemic was unknown, the agent causing the most devastating pandemic of humans in our recent history has been fully characterized shortly after its first identification in late 2019 in Wuhan, China.

Coronaviruses are relatively new threats to public health. However, the veterinary world has been fighting diseases caused by this family of highly variable RNA viruses for centuries. Furthermore, veterinarians have dealt with epidemics more frequently than physicians, with some recent relevant examples that, in many aspects, were as challenging as the current situation in humans. As the scientific world hurries up in an unprecedented raise for discovery, and reflects in the reasons and consequences of the current pandemic, here, we will offer a veterinary perspective to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Specialty Chief Editors of the 17 sections of Frontiers in Veterinary Science are invited to submit either perspective or opinion papers that will contribute to the scientific progress in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of their own discipline (in some exceptional cases, original research or brief research reports will be considered). We expect to generate a collection of papers that will help to bring a veterinary vision to issues, challenges, and features of the pandemic, of the causative agent, or epidemiological or social factors related to epidemic situations.

Similarly to the character that escaped blindness and was able to see during Saramago’s epidemic, we expect that this collection will contribute to the generation of the foundational knowledge and understanding required to develop tools and strategies to help the world fight one of the most impactful health challenges faced in the recent decades and mitigate the risk for similar events occurring in the future.

Please note: spontaneous submissions will not be considered for this collection.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Nobel Laureate Jose Saramago published “Blindness” (Ensaio sobre a cegueira in Portuguese) in 1995, a novel that describes the effects of a mass epidemic of blindness. Unlike Saramago’s assay, in which the cause of the epidemic was unknown, the agent causing the most devastating pandemic of humans in our recent history has been fully characterized shortly after its first identification in late 2019 in Wuhan, China.

Coronaviruses are relatively new threats to public health. However, the veterinary world has been fighting diseases caused by this family of highly variable RNA viruses for centuries. Furthermore, veterinarians have dealt with epidemics more frequently than physicians, with some recent relevant examples that, in many aspects, were as challenging as the current situation in humans. As the scientific world hurries up in an unprecedented raise for discovery, and reflects in the reasons and consequences of the current pandemic, here, we will offer a veterinary perspective to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Specialty Chief Editors of the 17 sections of Frontiers in Veterinary Science are invited to submit either perspective or opinion papers that will contribute to the scientific progress in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of their own discipline (in some exceptional cases, original research or brief research reports will be considered). We expect to generate a collection of papers that will help to bring a veterinary vision to issues, challenges, and features of the pandemic, of the causative agent, or epidemiological or social factors related to epidemic situations.

Similarly to the character that escaped blindness and was able to see during Saramago’s epidemic, we expect that this collection will contribute to the generation of the foundational knowledge and understanding required to develop tools and strategies to help the world fight one of the most impactful health challenges faced in the recent decades and mitigate the risk for similar events occurring in the future.

Please note: spontaneous submissions will not be considered for this collection.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 June 2020 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..