Research Topic

Nano-Biosensors: Rapid and Sensitive Detection and/ Destruction of Antibiotic-Resistant Microorganisms

About this Research Topic

Various classical techniques are available for the detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. For example, techniques have been developed and still in use in clinics, such as culture and colony counting, immunological approaches, polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, mass spectrometry, microarrays, fluorescent-based and electrochemical-based assays. However, these techniques have several limitations including being time-consuming, complex, requiring expensive equipment, and not being portable, meaning they are not suitable at the point of care. Over the past decade, several organic and biological targeting agents conjugated with various nanoparticles, naked nanoparticles, organic and biological molecules (luminescent polymers, dye functionalized DNA or RNA and natural or organic indicators) have been logically designed to develop novel, optic, colorimetric and magnetic (etc.) based nano-biosensors for detection of target pathogens.

Infectious diseases caused by bacteria have led to millions of deaths each year making them one of the largest problems threatening human health. For instance, recent studies reported that bacterial infectious significantly increased mortality compared to HIV/AIDS-related diseases in the United States. The pathogens are also dispersed in a wide range of areas such as soil, sea, feces, contaminated water, and foods. Today, bacteria (gram-negative or gram-positive) have developed strong resistance towards antibiotics. On the other hand, the use of unnecessary antibiotics in the fight against increasing infections harms both health and economy with the development of resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. Antibiotic-Resistant microorganisms have become a global health problem and pose a great danger both for today and for the future. While the total of direct and indirect costs in the U.S. exceeds 35 billion dollars today, it is reported that in the countries affiliated to the European Union, combating these microorganisms brings extra costs to health expenditures of approximately 1.5 billion dollars per year. World Health Organization (WHO) published a global action plan to combat antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in 2015 including Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coil, and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori).

Targeting ligand conjugate nanoparticles, naked nanoparticles, organic, and biological molecules have the potential to minimize the limitations of current detection techniques and thus have received considerable attention in the fabrication of nano-biosensors for the rapid and sensitive detection of bacteria. The scope of this issue covers the wide range of chemical, physical, and biological sciences for the design and fabrication of novel nano-biosensors and their application for the detection of bacteria. In this topic, we would like to invite, research on the design, fabrication, and applications of novel biosensors with novel, optic, colorimetric and magnetic responses, etc.

We particularly welcome contributions that include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

• Targeting ligands conjugated nanoparticles for use in nano-biosensors
• Naked nanoparticles for use in nano-biosensors
• Organic or biomolecules including luminescent polymer, dye functionalized DNA or RNA and natural or organic indicators
• Design and fabrication of novel nano-biosensors for the detection of antibacterial resistant microorganisms
• Applications of nano-biosensors with optic, colorimetric and magnetic responses


Keywords: Nano-Biosensors, Sensitive detection, nanoparticles, biomolecules, Antibiotic-Resistant Microorganisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Various classical techniques are available for the detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. For example, techniques have been developed and still in use in clinics, such as culture and colony counting, immunological approaches, polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, mass spectrometry, microarrays, fluorescent-based and electrochemical-based assays. However, these techniques have several limitations including being time-consuming, complex, requiring expensive equipment, and not being portable, meaning they are not suitable at the point of care. Over the past decade, several organic and biological targeting agents conjugated with various nanoparticles, naked nanoparticles, organic and biological molecules (luminescent polymers, dye functionalized DNA or RNA and natural or organic indicators) have been logically designed to develop novel, optic, colorimetric and magnetic (etc.) based nano-biosensors for detection of target pathogens.

Infectious diseases caused by bacteria have led to millions of deaths each year making them one of the largest problems threatening human health. For instance, recent studies reported that bacterial infectious significantly increased mortality compared to HIV/AIDS-related diseases in the United States. The pathogens are also dispersed in a wide range of areas such as soil, sea, feces, contaminated water, and foods. Today, bacteria (gram-negative or gram-positive) have developed strong resistance towards antibiotics. On the other hand, the use of unnecessary antibiotics in the fight against increasing infections harms both health and economy with the development of resistance in pathogenic microorganisms. Antibiotic-Resistant microorganisms have become a global health problem and pose a great danger both for today and for the future. While the total of direct and indirect costs in the U.S. exceeds 35 billion dollars today, it is reported that in the countries affiliated to the European Union, combating these microorganisms brings extra costs to health expenditures of approximately 1.5 billion dollars per year. World Health Organization (WHO) published a global action plan to combat antibiotic-resistant microorganisms in 2015 including Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coil, and Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori).

Targeting ligand conjugate nanoparticles, naked nanoparticles, organic, and biological molecules have the potential to minimize the limitations of current detection techniques and thus have received considerable attention in the fabrication of nano-biosensors for the rapid and sensitive detection of bacteria. The scope of this issue covers the wide range of chemical, physical, and biological sciences for the design and fabrication of novel nano-biosensors and their application for the detection of bacteria. In this topic, we would like to invite, research on the design, fabrication, and applications of novel biosensors with novel, optic, colorimetric and magnetic responses, etc.

We particularly welcome contributions that include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

• Targeting ligands conjugated nanoparticles for use in nano-biosensors
• Naked nanoparticles for use in nano-biosensors
• Organic or biomolecules including luminescent polymer, dye functionalized DNA or RNA and natural or organic indicators
• Design and fabrication of novel nano-biosensors for the detection of antibacterial resistant microorganisms
• Applications of nano-biosensors with optic, colorimetric and magnetic responses


Keywords: Nano-Biosensors, Sensitive detection, nanoparticles, biomolecules, Antibiotic-Resistant Microorganisms


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

18 January 2021 Manuscript
18 February 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

18 January 2021 Manuscript
18 February 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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