Research Topic

Management of Food Allergy: current status and future directions

About this Research Topic

Food allergies are defined as an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs, reproducibly, on exposure to a given food. The immune response to food may be immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated, non-IgE mediated, or mixed. Current evidence suggests that IgE-mediated food allergies are common, affecting up to 10% of children with increasing prevalence in the last decades. Food allergies represent a significant burden for affected individuals, resulting in fear of accidental reactions, dietary and social restrictions, high levels of anxiety related to the risk of severe reactions, fatalities, and, as a consequence, reduced quality of life.

While some food allergies (milk, egg, wheat, and soy) typically have a high rate of resolution in childhood and adolescence, others, such as peanut, tree nut, fish and shellfish allergies, tend to be lifelong and rarely resolved. Until recently, with the absence of a definitive cure, management of an IgE-mediated food allergy has been based on patient and family education, strict allergen avoidance, and prompt recognition and treatment of allergic reactions. However, there has been a decreasing compliance in diet adherence and self-management of anaphylactic reactions, especially in adolescents.

This Research Topic will present a comprehensive and updated overview of the management of food allergy, analyzing current available therapeutic strategies. Unraveling the complexity of immune regulatory and signalling mechanisms involved in allergy response will inevitably improve therapeutic approaches and provide further insights into the future care of children and adults with food allergies.

We welcome the submission of Original Research Articles, Reviews and Mini-Review Articles covering, but not limited to:

(1) Reaction severity and food type that drives and needs for active treatment
(2) Food allergen immunotherapy including oral immunotherapy and epicutaneous immunotherapy
(3) Allergen dosage and formulation in AIT
(4) Putative mechanisms of action of AIT
(5) Use of biologics in food allergy
(6) Issues for clinical practice


Keywords: Food allergy, allergy management, allergen immunotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Food allergies are defined as an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs, reproducibly, on exposure to a given food. The immune response to food may be immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated, non-IgE mediated, or mixed. Current evidence suggests that IgE-mediated food allergies are common, affecting up to 10% of children with increasing prevalence in the last decades. Food allergies represent a significant burden for affected individuals, resulting in fear of accidental reactions, dietary and social restrictions, high levels of anxiety related to the risk of severe reactions, fatalities, and, as a consequence, reduced quality of life.

While some food allergies (milk, egg, wheat, and soy) typically have a high rate of resolution in childhood and adolescence, others, such as peanut, tree nut, fish and shellfish allergies, tend to be lifelong and rarely resolved. Until recently, with the absence of a definitive cure, management of an IgE-mediated food allergy has been based on patient and family education, strict allergen avoidance, and prompt recognition and treatment of allergic reactions. However, there has been a decreasing compliance in diet adherence and self-management of anaphylactic reactions, especially in adolescents.

This Research Topic will present a comprehensive and updated overview of the management of food allergy, analyzing current available therapeutic strategies. Unraveling the complexity of immune regulatory and signalling mechanisms involved in allergy response will inevitably improve therapeutic approaches and provide further insights into the future care of children and adults with food allergies.

We welcome the submission of Original Research Articles, Reviews and Mini-Review Articles covering, but not limited to:

(1) Reaction severity and food type that drives and needs for active treatment
(2) Food allergen immunotherapy including oral immunotherapy and epicutaneous immunotherapy
(3) Allergen dosage and formulation in AIT
(4) Putative mechanisms of action of AIT
(5) Use of biologics in food allergy
(6) Issues for clinical practice


Keywords: Food allergy, allergy management, allergen immunotherapy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

07 November 2020 Abstract
07 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

07 November 2020 Abstract
07 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..