Research Topic

Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Hirschsprung Disease and Its Complications

About this Research Topic

Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a special type of enteric neuropathy, which typically leads to intestinal obstruction in newborns, and has attracted wide attention from pediatric surgeons throughout the world. Despite advances in surgical approaches, such as transanal pull-through and laparoscopic-assisted surgery, which have greatly improved the operative safety and avoided certain complications caused by open-surgery, patients with HSCR are still suffering from postoperative complications and intestinal dysfunction, which significantly impact their quality of life. Postoperative complications of HSCR can be categorized into early and late complications. Studies have reported that 10% to 15% of patients had at least one early complication (e.g., wound infection, anastomosis bleeding or stenosis, adhesive intestinal obstruction, or ostomy complications). In contrast, late complications, including constipation recurrence, Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC), and soiling/incontinence, occurs in 15% to 40% of the cases.

The overarching goal of this Research Topic is to explore the pathophysiological characteristics of enteric neuropathies, to popularize HSCR diagnostic methods, and to standardize HSCR treatment strategies. We would also like to bring attention to the prevention and control of postoperative complications as well as the establishment of normal postoperative defecation through comprehensive rehabilitation training programs.

We welcome contributions of Original Research, Methods, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Perspective, Clinical Trial, Case Report, General Commentary, and Opinion encompassing epidemiological, clinical, translational, and basic research focusing on, but not limited to, the following aspects:
- Genetics of enteric neuropathies
- Establishment of the development model of the intestinal tract and Enteric Nervous System (ENS)
- Molecular, immunological and electrophysiological studies focusing on an optimal diagnostic model of HSCR
- The application of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) in the treatment of HSCR
- Intestinal transplantation for total intestinal HSCR
- Stem cell therapy for enteric neuropathies
- Epidemiological study on optimized HSCR treatment strategies and postoperative rehabilitation training
- Anatomic pathology of postoperative recurrence of constipation
- Reconstruction of defecation control mechanism after HSCR radical colectomy
- Pathophysiology of HAEC
- Establishment of standardized administration strategies for postoperative complications in HSCR
- Informative Case Reports that expand our knowledge on optimal surgical strategy


Keywords: Enteric Neuropathies, Anorectal Physiology, Diagnosis Strategy, Operative Procedures, Postoperative Rehabilitation Program


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a special type of enteric neuropathy, which typically leads to intestinal obstruction in newborns, and has attracted wide attention from pediatric surgeons throughout the world. Despite advances in surgical approaches, such as transanal pull-through and laparoscopic-assisted surgery, which have greatly improved the operative safety and avoided certain complications caused by open-surgery, patients with HSCR are still suffering from postoperative complications and intestinal dysfunction, which significantly impact their quality of life. Postoperative complications of HSCR can be categorized into early and late complications. Studies have reported that 10% to 15% of patients had at least one early complication (e.g., wound infection, anastomosis bleeding or stenosis, adhesive intestinal obstruction, or ostomy complications). In contrast, late complications, including constipation recurrence, Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC), and soiling/incontinence, occurs in 15% to 40% of the cases.

The overarching goal of this Research Topic is to explore the pathophysiological characteristics of enteric neuropathies, to popularize HSCR diagnostic methods, and to standardize HSCR treatment strategies. We would also like to bring attention to the prevention and control of postoperative complications as well as the establishment of normal postoperative defecation through comprehensive rehabilitation training programs.

We welcome contributions of Original Research, Methods, Review, Hypothesis and Theory, Perspective, Clinical Trial, Case Report, General Commentary, and Opinion encompassing epidemiological, clinical, translational, and basic research focusing on, but not limited to, the following aspects:
- Genetics of enteric neuropathies
- Establishment of the development model of the intestinal tract and Enteric Nervous System (ENS)
- Molecular, immunological and electrophysiological studies focusing on an optimal diagnostic model of HSCR
- The application of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) in the treatment of HSCR
- Intestinal transplantation for total intestinal HSCR
- Stem cell therapy for enteric neuropathies
- Epidemiological study on optimized HSCR treatment strategies and postoperative rehabilitation training
- Anatomic pathology of postoperative recurrence of constipation
- Reconstruction of defecation control mechanism after HSCR radical colectomy
- Pathophysiology of HAEC
- Establishment of standardized administration strategies for postoperative complications in HSCR
- Informative Case Reports that expand our knowledge on optimal surgical strategy


Keywords: Enteric Neuropathies, Anorectal Physiology, Diagnosis Strategy, Operative Procedures, Postoperative Rehabilitation Program


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

05 December 2020 Manuscript
28 February 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

05 December 2020 Manuscript
28 February 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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