Research Topic

3D Brain Organoids in Neurological Diseases

About this Research Topic

In recent years, the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into any cell type of the body has provided a versatile platform for the functional study of various neurological disorders, including stroke and Parkinson's Disease. However, it is almost impossible to model a complex system in a ...

In recent years, the differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into any cell type of the body has provided a versatile platform for the functional study of various neurological disorders, including stroke and Parkinson's Disease. However, it is almost impossible to model a complex system in a dish by the use of iPSC technology alone. There is emerging evidence that 2D cell culture system is hard to model the synaptic connections of the dendrites and growth cones on a three-dimensional level, greatly limiting our understanding of the cellular functionality and the microenvironment of the brain.

Cells in a 3D in vitro setting have proved to be closer to physiological body conditions. Notably, significantly different gene and protein expression profiles, and a similar cellular response to drug administration in 3D brain organoids have been reported when comparing to 2D cultures. Moreover, 3D culture system can model the internal microenvironment composed of various autocrine signals, and can more accurately model cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and synaptic connections between different cell types in different brain regions. Along with the improvement of 3D brain organoids, this novel technology may pave the way to the development of new treatments for neurological disorders.

The aims of this Research Topic are to update the current understanding and future directions of 3D brain organoids for neurological diseases. The scope of the specialty section covers all relevant technologies and topics, from molecular and cellular studies to animal and human researches. We will gladly consider original researches, review, perspectives, and commentaries relating to the role of brain organoids in the field of neurodegeneration. Contributions that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics are welcome:
• Brain organoids and their potential application in the context of neurological disorders.
• Mechanisms of brain organoid migration, distribution and interaction with the host brain microenvironment after transplanted.
• Brain organoids in drug screening.
• Pre-clinical proof-of-concept studies in animal models of stroke, Parkinson's Disease, and other neurological disorders.
• In vivo tracking techniques of brain organoids in host brain, particularly using molecular imaging technique.


Keywords: brain organoids, stem cells, neurological disorders, stoke, therapy


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Submission Deadlines

28 December 2020 Manuscript
31 January 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 December 2020 Manuscript
31 January 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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