Research Topic

Nanotechnology for Indoor Air Pollution Control

About this Research Topic

Indoor air quality is a key factor determining people’s exposure to air pollutants and has a significant impact on human health, as modern lifestyle requires the majority of people to spend most of their time indoors,. As the energy efficiency of modern buildings increases, indoor air pollution has become an increasingly more severe problem, which must be addressed along with our efforts to combat global warming. The two most common approaches to abating indoor air pollution are reducing the emission of pollutants with primarily indoor sources, such as formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and enhancing indoor space ventilation. In cases where these two approaches are ineffective or infeasible, it is necessary to remove pollutants from indoor air by such means as filtration, adsorption and catalytic transformation, which can be enhanced by nanotechnology solutions.

Various methods have been developed to remove particulate and gaseous pollutants from indoor air, including filtration, adsorption, (thermal) catalytic degradation and photocatalytic oxidation. While a myriad of indoor air purification materials and devices are commercially available, their performance after prolonged use is typically unsatisfactory, which entails frequent replacement or regeneration of the functional materials, such as the filter, adsorbent or (photo)catalyst. Moreover, the existing technologies can hardly achieve the selective removal of priority pollutants (e.g., formaldehyde) in the presence of other indoor air constituents (e.g., more abundant but less hazardous VOCs, and water vapor). The recent development of nanotechnology could provide promising solutions to these problems and significantly increase the efficiency and selectivity of indoor air purification techniques, thereby enhancing the long-term performance and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, it is of significance and urgency to design and prepare nanotechnology-enabled filters, adsorbents and (photo)catalysts that show high performance for indoor air pollution control.

This Research Topic welcomes original research articles and reviews on the design of nanomaterials and development of nanotechnologies that can achieve efficient indoor air pollution control. The specific topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Nano-enabled filters for removing indoor particulate matter, including bioaerosols and airborne pathogens
• Nano-enabled adsorbents and (photo)catalysts for efficient removal of organic indoor air pollutants, such as formaldehyde, benzene, odorous compounds and other VOCs
• Nano-enabled adsorbents and (photo)catalysts for efficient removal of inorganic indoor air pollutants, such as ozone, nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide
• Nano-enabled devices for indoor air purification.


Keywords: nanostructure, nanocomposite, catalytic oxidation, environmental catalysis, photocatalysis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Indoor air quality is a key factor determining people’s exposure to air pollutants and has a significant impact on human health, as modern lifestyle requires the majority of people to spend most of their time indoors,. As the energy efficiency of modern buildings increases, indoor air pollution has become an increasingly more severe problem, which must be addressed along with our efforts to combat global warming. The two most common approaches to abating indoor air pollution are reducing the emission of pollutants with primarily indoor sources, such as formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and enhancing indoor space ventilation. In cases where these two approaches are ineffective or infeasible, it is necessary to remove pollutants from indoor air by such means as filtration, adsorption and catalytic transformation, which can be enhanced by nanotechnology solutions.

Various methods have been developed to remove particulate and gaseous pollutants from indoor air, including filtration, adsorption, (thermal) catalytic degradation and photocatalytic oxidation. While a myriad of indoor air purification materials and devices are commercially available, their performance after prolonged use is typically unsatisfactory, which entails frequent replacement or regeneration of the functional materials, such as the filter, adsorbent or (photo)catalyst. Moreover, the existing technologies can hardly achieve the selective removal of priority pollutants (e.g., formaldehyde) in the presence of other indoor air constituents (e.g., more abundant but less hazardous VOCs, and water vapor). The recent development of nanotechnology could provide promising solutions to these problems and significantly increase the efficiency and selectivity of indoor air purification techniques, thereby enhancing the long-term performance and cost-effectiveness. Therefore, it is of significance and urgency to design and prepare nanotechnology-enabled filters, adsorbents and (photo)catalysts that show high performance for indoor air pollution control.

This Research Topic welcomes original research articles and reviews on the design of nanomaterials and development of nanotechnologies that can achieve efficient indoor air pollution control. The specific topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Nano-enabled filters for removing indoor particulate matter, including bioaerosols and airborne pathogens
• Nano-enabled adsorbents and (photo)catalysts for efficient removal of organic indoor air pollutants, such as formaldehyde, benzene, odorous compounds and other VOCs
• Nano-enabled adsorbents and (photo)catalysts for efficient removal of inorganic indoor air pollutants, such as ozone, nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide
• Nano-enabled devices for indoor air purification.


Keywords: nanostructure, nanocomposite, catalytic oxidation, environmental catalysis, photocatalysis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 February 2021 Manuscript
26 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 February 2021 Manuscript
26 March 2021 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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