Research Topic

Anthropogenic Wildlife Movements and Infectious Diseases: Health and Conservation Perspectives

About this Research Topic

Animal movements due to human activities are one of the main causes of local, regional, national and international spread of diseases, including diseases of public health concern. This includes anthropogenic movements of wildlife, which are among the leading causes of newly emerging disease of both wildlife and people. Anthropogenic movements of wildlife can be due to several reasons: restocking of game animals for hunting purposes, translocations in the framework of reintroduction programs for biodiversity conservation, breeding and reintroduction programs, national and international trade (both legal and illegal), but also a range of human activities including alterations of normal habitat use and movement patterns of wildlife (agriculture, linear development, urbanization etc.).
Understanding the risks associated with the artificial movements of wildlife is necessary to increase awareness and facilitate the application of preventive and control measures to reduce disease spread.

The overall aim of this Research Topic is to collect relevant past or current information illustrating how anthropogenic wildlife movements can result in the spread of pathogens, recurrence in areas previously free, changes in the epidemiological patterns of a diseases, or the introduction of exotic pathogens. Theoretical or applied frameworks to identify, quantify and minimize the risk of disease spread via anthropogenic wildlife movement (including via policy change) are also within the scope of this topic.

This Research Topic invites original articles, up-to-date critical reviews and expert commentaries/perspectives on all aspects linking infectious diseases to anthropogenic wildlife movements. The collection welcomes, but is not limited to, papers addressing the following themes:
• Emerging wildlife and zoonotic pathogens
• Trade-off or potential synergies between health and conservation management (including for climate adaptation)
• Hunting and disease movement
• Wildlife translocation for wildlife conservation management
• Legal and illegal domestic and international wildlife trade
• Movement of invasive species due to human activities
• Other human-caused movement alteration due to agricultural activities, land-use change, linear developments etc.


Keywords: Anthropogenic, Wildlife movement, Infectious Diseases, Conservation, Translocation, Pathogens


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Animal movements due to human activities are one of the main causes of local, regional, national and international spread of diseases, including diseases of public health concern. This includes anthropogenic movements of wildlife, which are among the leading causes of newly emerging disease of both wildlife and people. Anthropogenic movements of wildlife can be due to several reasons: restocking of game animals for hunting purposes, translocations in the framework of reintroduction programs for biodiversity conservation, breeding and reintroduction programs, national and international trade (both legal and illegal), but also a range of human activities including alterations of normal habitat use and movement patterns of wildlife (agriculture, linear development, urbanization etc.).
Understanding the risks associated with the artificial movements of wildlife is necessary to increase awareness and facilitate the application of preventive and control measures to reduce disease spread.

The overall aim of this Research Topic is to collect relevant past or current information illustrating how anthropogenic wildlife movements can result in the spread of pathogens, recurrence in areas previously free, changes in the epidemiological patterns of a diseases, or the introduction of exotic pathogens. Theoretical or applied frameworks to identify, quantify and minimize the risk of disease spread via anthropogenic wildlife movement (including via policy change) are also within the scope of this topic.

This Research Topic invites original articles, up-to-date critical reviews and expert commentaries/perspectives on all aspects linking infectious diseases to anthropogenic wildlife movements. The collection welcomes, but is not limited to, papers addressing the following themes:
• Emerging wildlife and zoonotic pathogens
• Trade-off or potential synergies between health and conservation management (including for climate adaptation)
• Hunting and disease movement
• Wildlife translocation for wildlife conservation management
• Legal and illegal domestic and international wildlife trade
• Movement of invasive species due to human activities
• Other human-caused movement alteration due to agricultural activities, land-use change, linear developments etc.


Keywords: Anthropogenic, Wildlife movement, Infectious Diseases, Conservation, Translocation, Pathogens


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 May 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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