Research Topic

Air pollution and allergic disease

About this Research Topic

Air pollution is the largest environmental cause of disease and premature death in the world today, responsible for approximately 16% of all deaths worldwide. There is long-standing interest in the role of indoor and outdoor air pollutants and allergens on allergic disease development. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodeling, and increased risk of sensitization. However, epidemiological studies have not provided consistence and clear evidence of an association between air pollution and allergic diseases. This may be because of a lack of information on how air pollution influences the development of allergic sensitization or predisposes a sensitized individual to react to lower allergen (pollen, mold) concentrations. Furthermore, how pollutants and allergens interact in real-world settings, and the consequences on respiratory and allergic health are largely unknown. Most studies have focused on particulate matter and little is known about the association with specific chemicals.

The goal of this Research Topic is to improve our understanding of the impact of air pollution on the development, exacerbation and persistence of allergic disease. Recent studies have shown that climate change has an impact on the duration, geographical spread and intensity of pollen seasons as well as mold growth, which both affect allergic disorders such as rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma. Since air pollution is directly linked to climate change and also potentially to allergic disease, the likely complex interplay between these factors is an important concern for public health. This Research Topic also aims to understand the biological mechanisms underlying associations between air pollution and allergic disease. Recent advances in the field have shown that besides mechanistic studies, genetic, epigenetic and metabolomic studies can improve the understanding of how air pollution might be linked to allergic disease.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Air pollution and allergies
• Climate change and allergies
• Airborne allergens (pollen, mold) and allergies
• Greenness and green spaces and allergies
• Chemical exposures and allergies
• Epigenetics and allergies
• Gene-environment interactions
• Metabolomics
We are interested in Original Research as well as Review Articles.


Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental pollutants, Airborne allergens, Allergies, Asthma


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Air pollution is the largest environmental cause of disease and premature death in the world today, responsible for approximately 16% of all deaths worldwide. There is long-standing interest in the role of indoor and outdoor air pollutants and allergens on allergic disease development. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodeling, and increased risk of sensitization. However, epidemiological studies have not provided consistence and clear evidence of an association between air pollution and allergic diseases. This may be because of a lack of information on how air pollution influences the development of allergic sensitization or predisposes a sensitized individual to react to lower allergen (pollen, mold) concentrations. Furthermore, how pollutants and allergens interact in real-world settings, and the consequences on respiratory and allergic health are largely unknown. Most studies have focused on particulate matter and little is known about the association with specific chemicals.

The goal of this Research Topic is to improve our understanding of the impact of air pollution on the development, exacerbation and persistence of allergic disease. Recent studies have shown that climate change has an impact on the duration, geographical spread and intensity of pollen seasons as well as mold growth, which both affect allergic disorders such as rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma. Since air pollution is directly linked to climate change and also potentially to allergic disease, the likely complex interplay between these factors is an important concern for public health. This Research Topic also aims to understand the biological mechanisms underlying associations between air pollution and allergic disease. Recent advances in the field have shown that besides mechanistic studies, genetic, epigenetic and metabolomic studies can improve the understanding of how air pollution might be linked to allergic disease.

Areas to be covered in this Research Topic may include, but are not limited to:
• Air pollution and allergies
• Climate change and allergies
• Airborne allergens (pollen, mold) and allergies
• Greenness and green spaces and allergies
• Chemical exposures and allergies
• Epigenetics and allergies
• Gene-environment interactions
• Metabolomics
We are interested in Original Research as well as Review Articles.


Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental pollutants, Airborne allergens, Allergies, Asthma


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

28 September 2020 Abstract
27 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

28 September 2020 Abstract
27 January 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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