Research Topic

Inflammation Among Racial, Ethnic, and Sexual Minority Adolescents

About this Research Topic

Emerging evidence shows that adult minority populations, both racial/ethnic and sexual minority populations, experience disparities not just in sexual and reproductive health outcomes, but chronic diseases as well. In part, this stems from increased levels of systemic inflammation incurred over years of stress and anxiety due to a host of factors (e.g. increased stigma-related discrimination, higher rates of homelessness and poverty). An area that requires urgent attention is investigation as to whether this inflammation starts earlier in life, namely during adolescence. Importantly, this period is when many minority populations begin to feel increasing stress directly as a result of their minority status, potentially setting the stage for long-term exposure to elevated inflammation.

In this Research Topic, we will explore all facets of systemic inflammation among adolescents, in terms of biologic pathways, predictors, and consequences of early exposure. In particular, we are interested in developing a better understanding of the pathways of inflammation to reduce downstream comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancers. We are interested in any papers on racial, ethnic, and sexual minority populations as these populations have unique experiences of several risk factors related to inflammation, factors which may be targets for interventions aimed at reducing health disparities among these populations. Priority will be given to those papers focusing on any aspect of sexual and reproductive health.

We welcome all contributions related to any facet of systemic inflammation. This could include individual biomarkers of inflammation, biologic pathways to inflammation, etiology of diseases caused by elevated inflammation, or epidemiologic studies aimed at better understanding inflammation among minority populations. We would particularly welcome novel insights to understudied mechanisms of inflammation among adolescents such as stressors, minority stigma, and substance use.


Keywords: Inflammation, Minorities, Adolescents, Mechanisms, Epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Emerging evidence shows that adult minority populations, both racial/ethnic and sexual minority populations, experience disparities not just in sexual and reproductive health outcomes, but chronic diseases as well. In part, this stems from increased levels of systemic inflammation incurred over years of stress and anxiety due to a host of factors (e.g. increased stigma-related discrimination, higher rates of homelessness and poverty). An area that requires urgent attention is investigation as to whether this inflammation starts earlier in life, namely during adolescence. Importantly, this period is when many minority populations begin to feel increasing stress directly as a result of their minority status, potentially setting the stage for long-term exposure to elevated inflammation.

In this Research Topic, we will explore all facets of systemic inflammation among adolescents, in terms of biologic pathways, predictors, and consequences of early exposure. In particular, we are interested in developing a better understanding of the pathways of inflammation to reduce downstream comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancers. We are interested in any papers on racial, ethnic, and sexual minority populations as these populations have unique experiences of several risk factors related to inflammation, factors which may be targets for interventions aimed at reducing health disparities among these populations. Priority will be given to those papers focusing on any aspect of sexual and reproductive health.

We welcome all contributions related to any facet of systemic inflammation. This could include individual biomarkers of inflammation, biologic pathways to inflammation, etiology of diseases caused by elevated inflammation, or epidemiologic studies aimed at better understanding inflammation among minority populations. We would particularly welcome novel insights to understudied mechanisms of inflammation among adolescents such as stressors, minority stigma, and substance use.


Keywords: Inflammation, Minorities, Adolescents, Mechanisms, Epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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