Research Topic

Epidemiology of Influenza and Other Respiratory Pathogens During the Coronavirus COVID-19 Pandemic

About this Research Topic

The COVID-19 pandemic has far-reaching implications in the diagnosis, treatment, and control of respiratory pathogens. One immediate concern is the convergence of SARS-CoV-2 and other human respiratory pathogens. While lockdowns, social distancing, and other public health measures have contributed to the decrease in the number of reported cases of respiratory diseases, such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and others; these control measures may increase the number of the cases of other communicable diseases, such as tuberculosis, due to the disruption in the health services brought about by the pandemic. In addition, these current reductions are likely to be transitory and the usual pathogens are likely to re-emerge at some point in time and co-circulate with SARS-CoV-2.

Our knowledge is still limited on how to control and manage the novel coronavirus and how it affects ongoing health activities for combating influenza and other respiratory pathogens. Basic epidemiological data is urgently needed in order to provide evidence and help researchers, clinicians, and policy makers in addressing these issues. This Research Topic aims to determine the epidemiology of influenza and other human respiratory pathogens in context of co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 and monitor how it affects disease severity and clinical outcomes. Further of interest is whether there will be changes in the characteristics of influenza and other respiratory viruses when they re-emerge following the initial wave of COVID-19 due to various potential viral bottlenecks.

• Surveillance studies including hospital, community, national, or regional-based monitoring.
• Differences in outcomes across age groups, geographic location, and ethnicity.
• Molecular epidemiology and laboratory-based detection.
• Development of diagnostics tests and protocol.
• Pathogenesis and risk factors of disease severity.
• Virus-virus and virus-bacteria interactions in COVID-19 patients with coinfections.
• Molecular factors that affect the host immune response to pathogens.
• Therapeutics (antiviral and antibiotics usage).


Keywords: influenza, human respiratory viruses, SARS-CoV-2, bacterial pneumonia, epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The COVID-19 pandemic has far-reaching implications in the diagnosis, treatment, and control of respiratory pathogens. One immediate concern is the convergence of SARS-CoV-2 and other human respiratory pathogens. While lockdowns, social distancing, and other public health measures have contributed to the decrease in the number of reported cases of respiratory diseases, such as influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and others; these control measures may increase the number of the cases of other communicable diseases, such as tuberculosis, due to the disruption in the health services brought about by the pandemic. In addition, these current reductions are likely to be transitory and the usual pathogens are likely to re-emerge at some point in time and co-circulate with SARS-CoV-2.

Our knowledge is still limited on how to control and manage the novel coronavirus and how it affects ongoing health activities for combating influenza and other respiratory pathogens. Basic epidemiological data is urgently needed in order to provide evidence and help researchers, clinicians, and policy makers in addressing these issues. This Research Topic aims to determine the epidemiology of influenza and other human respiratory pathogens in context of co-infection with SARS-CoV-2 and monitor how it affects disease severity and clinical outcomes. Further of interest is whether there will be changes in the characteristics of influenza and other respiratory viruses when they re-emerge following the initial wave of COVID-19 due to various potential viral bottlenecks.

• Surveillance studies including hospital, community, national, or regional-based monitoring.
• Differences in outcomes across age groups, geographic location, and ethnicity.
• Molecular epidemiology and laboratory-based detection.
• Development of diagnostics tests and protocol.
• Pathogenesis and risk factors of disease severity.
• Virus-virus and virus-bacteria interactions in COVID-19 patients with coinfections.
• Molecular factors that affect the host immune response to pathogens.
• Therapeutics (antiviral and antibiotics usage).


Keywords: influenza, human respiratory viruses, SARS-CoV-2, bacterial pneumonia, epidemiology


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 January 2021 Abstract
30 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 January 2021 Abstract
30 April 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..